Genetic genealogy helps ID victim of Green River Killer

first_imgSEATTLE (AP) — Authorities in Washington state say genetic genealogy has helped identify the youngest known victim of one of the nation’s most prolific serial killers. The remains of 14-year-old Wendy Stephens were found nearly 37 years ago near a baseball field. Gary Ridgway, the Green River Killer, has pleaded guilty to murdering 49 women and girls in the 1980s. Four of them were unidentified, including Stephens. Researchers at the DNA Doe Project helped with the identification. The project uses publicly available DNA databases to locate relatives of unknown crime victims. The King County Sheriff’s Office in Seattle said Monday that Stephens had run away from her home in Denver in 1983.last_img

WHO team in Wuhan visits disease control centers

first_imgWUHAN, China (AP) — A World Health Organization team investigating the origins of the coronavirus pandemic has visited two disease control centers in the province where the outbreak emerged. The WHO investigators arrived in Wuhan, the Hubei provincial capital, last month to look for clues. They have visited hospitals and a seafood market where early cases were detected. The team on Monday visited the Hubei Provincial Center for Disease Control and its Wuhan city office, amid tight Chinese controls on access to information about the virus. China has sought to avoid blame for alleged missteps in its early response to the outbreak, while promoting alternative theories that the virus originated elsewhere.last_img

Long-detained immigrant families could soon face deportation

first_imgHOUSTON (AP) — Lawyers working with immigrant families detained by the U.S. government for more than a year say they’re worried the families could be deported as soon as this week. Six parents and six children could be placed on deportation flights as early as Wednesday, even though they continue to fight to win asylum, the lawyers said. The families say they were unfairly denied protections under several policies enacted by former President Donald Trump’s administration that courts later prohibited.last_img

Portugal vaccine rollout gets new chief after unsteady start

first_imgLISBON, Portugal (AP) — The new head of Portugal’s COVID-19 vaccination task force is due to start work Thursday. He takes charge a day after his predecessor resigned amid scandals over vaccine queue-jumping and frustration over a sluggish rollout similar to that seen in other European Union countries. At the current rate of vaccination, Portugal will reach its target of 70% of vaccinated adults only in 2023. Its goal was to reach that milestone in late summer this year. Portuguese officials note that they have received fewer vaccines than promised from manufacturers and say EU authorization of more vaccines will help accelerate the program.last_img