Jelling as a team biggest challenge for PH volleybelles, says Reyes

first_imgNational team skipper Mika Reyes. Photo by Bong Lozada/iNQUIRERThe biggest challenge for national team skipper Mika Reyes is not managing egos. Instead, it’s bringing together a group of players who came from different teams gathered for one common goal.“Actually, I think my work as a captain isn’t that hard because we’re not kids anymore,” said Reyes in Filipino during the team’s media day Friday at Arellano School of Law. “You won’t have to always tell them what to do.”ADVERTISEMENT “The challenge here is how we’ll bond together as one group, skills-wise, attitude-wise, and character-wise because we didn’t come from one team, we were selected from different teams and this was the only time we were together.”The national squad is composed of players selected from several teams in the Philippine Super Liga with Alyssa Valdez the only one coming from the Premier Volleyball League.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSEnd of his agony? SC rules in favor of Espinosa, orders promoter heirs to pay boxing legendSPORTSRedemption is sweet for Ginebra, Scottie ThompsonSPORTSMayweather beats Pacquiao, Canelo for ‘Fighter of the Decade’Reyes added their upcoming training camp in Japan is the prime opportunity for them to bond further as a team following episodes where they had to cancel practices due to absent players.The team is set to leave for Japan late July to prepare for the upcoming 19th Asian Senior Women’s Volleyball Championship and the 2017 Southeast Asian Games. MOST READ Gilas battles title favorite Canada in Jones Cup opener OSG plea to revoke ABS-CBN franchise ‘a duplicitous move’ – Lacson “This will be a new opportunity for us, yes everyone is good individually, but the challenge is how we’ll jell as one team because it’s not just one or two players who plays in a team,” said Reyes.Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Duterte’s ‘soft heart’ could save ABS-CBN, says election lawyer PH’s Rogen Ladon boxing flyweight final (HIGHLIGHTS) PLAY LIST 03:30PH’s Rogen Ladon boxing flyweight final (HIGHLIGHTS)03:34PH’s Carlo Paalam boxing light flyweight final (HIGHLIGHTS)02:39PH’s Josie Gabuco boxing light flyweight final (HIGHLIGHTS)01:40Filipinos turn Taal Volcano ash, plastic trash into bricks01:32Taal Volcano watch: Island fissures steaming, lake water receding02:14Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard02:56NCRPO pledges to donate P3.5 million to victims of Taal eruption00:56Heavy rain brings some relief in Australia02:37Calm moments allow Taal folks some respite IT happens: Facebook sorry for Xi Jinping’s name mistranslation LIVE: Sinulog 2020 Grand Paradecenter_img Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Marcosian mode: Duterte threatens to arrest water execs ‘one night’ End of his agony? SC rules in favor of Espinosa, orders promoter heirs to pay boxing legend 787 earthquakes recorded in 24 hours due to restive Taal Volcano Missile-capable frigate BRP Jose Rizal inches closer to entering PH Navy’s fleet Malacañang open to creating Taal Commission LATEST STORIES View commentslast_img read more

Medicaid Death Debt Causes Some To Step Away From Coverage

first_imgMedicaid ‘Death Debt’ Causes Some To Step Away From Coverage This is part of the KHN Morning Briefing, a summary of health policy coverage from major news organizations. Sign up for an email subscription. A little-known aspect of Medicaid allows states, in certain cases, to recoup medical costs by claiming deceased people’s homes, which is causing some people to avoid coverage, even those who are newly eligible under the health law’s expanded eligibility.  The Washington Post: Little-Known Aspect Of Medicaid Now Causing People To Avoid CoverageAdd this to the scary but improbable things people are hearing could happen because of the new federal health-care law: After you die, the state could come after your house. The concern arises from a long-standing but little-known aspect of Medicaid, the state-federal program that provides health coverage to millions of low-income Americans. In certain cases, a state can recoup its medical costs by putting a claim on a deceased person’s assets. This is not an issue for people buying private coverage on online marketplaces. And experts say it is unlikely that the millions of people in more than two dozen states becoming eligible for Medicaid under the program’s expansion will be affected by this rule. But the fear that the government could one day seize their homes is deterring some people from signing up (Somashekhar, 1/23).Fox News: ObamaCare Death Debt? States Can Seize Assets To Recoup Medicaid CostsTom Gialanella, 56, was shocked to find out he qualified for Medicaid under ObamaCare. The Bothell, Wash., resident had been able to retire early years ago, owns his home outright in a pricey Seattle suburb and is living off his investments. He wanted no part of the government’s so-called free health care. “It’s supposed to be a safety net program. It’s not supposed to be for someone who has assets who can pay the bill,” he said.  And after reading the fine print, Gialanella had another reason to flee Medicaid — the potential death debt (Springer, 1/23). Other implementation policy headlines include a Reuters report that some niche government plans will not face a 2014 penalty for not meeting the health law’s essential benefits requirements, a Marketplace story detailing how rural health care options are limited and Politico Pro’s report on the paths businesses see under Obamacare –  Reuters: No Obamacare Penalty For Few In Some Niche Government PlansThe Obama administration on Thursday said people enrolled in some small, government-sponsored healthcare plans will not face a penalty under Obamacare in 2014, even though their coverage does not meet the healthcare reform law’s minimum requirements. In proposed rules released by the Internal Revenue Service, the administration said narrowly defined government coverage including programs limited to family planning or tuberculosis-related services through Medicaid do not meet minimum essential coverage standards (1/23).Marketplace: Rural Americans Have Fewer – And Costlier – Healthcare OptionsWhen you think of the healthcare marketplace, you think of options and choices. But since the rollout of the Affordable Care Act, one thing’s been clear: Options are not a given. Alabama is among a dozen or so states where every county has just one–or maybe two– insurers. Experts are noticing a pattern: Folks in rural towns seem to have the fewest choices, and the costliest plans (Douban, 1/23). Politico Pro: Like Target, Businesses Plotting Obamacare PathsTarget became the latest big company to follow the old drill: drop health coverage for some workers, blame Obamacare and watch Republicans pounce. Home Depot and Trader Joe’s made similar changes to their health plans last year, and UPS limited coverage for spouses. Each time, it drew ugly headlines for the health care law. While each situation was a little different, the initial conclusion that Obamacare was leaving consumers worse off starts to gets squishy when the details are unpacked. But an impression was created (Nather and Cunningham, 1/23).Also in the news –  Fox News:  Fox News Poll: ObamaCare Support Hits Record LowA record high number of voters now oppose the 2010 Affordable Care Act and a record low number supports it, according to the latest Fox News poll. In addition, a majority thinks the new law will increase their health care costs, while few think it will improve their quality of care. The new poll finds 59 percent of voters oppose the health care law, up from 55 percent who opposed it six months ago (June 2013).  The increase in opposition comes from both independents and Democrats (Blanton, 1/23). last_img read more