Called to serve’

first_imgAfter 70 years, University President Emeritus Fr. Theodore Hesburgh finally realized his dream of becoming a chaplain in the United States Navy. Rear Admiral Mark Tidd, chief of chaplains for the United States Navy, designated Hesburgh an honorary naval chaplain in a special ceremony Wednesday night in the Carey Auditorium of the Hesburgh Library. Captain Earl Carter, commanding officer of Notre Dame’s Navy Reserve Officer Training Corps (ROTC), said the “well-deserved and significant” event was about honoring Hesburgh for his leadership and life-long legacy of service. “Today we honor this selfless leader who has done so much for so many,” Carter said. In awarding Hesburgh, Tidd said he could think of no one who better exemplified the navy chaplain motto “vocati ad servitium,” or “called to serve.” “The Latin words on the naval chaplain corps seal are translated ‘called to serve,’” Tidd said. “In my mind there is no one more deserving to be named an honorary naval chaplain than someone who has answered the call to serve our nation, the call to serve the world, and the call to serve God.” “Fr. Hesburgh, I am humbled to be able to declare: you are an honorary navy chaplain.” Hesburgh said he was touched by the honor, and both he and the University would continue to cherish a connection with the U.S. Navy. “I can’t tell you how much I am touched to be honored by my Navy brothers. … The Navy is welcome at Notre Dame,” Hesburgh said. “Notre Dame is better because we’ve had the Navy here as long as we’ve had ROTC. “I can feel even closer to our Naval ROTC students now that I am an officer in the navy. I will continue to serve our navy and country in every way possible. Anchors away.” Tidd said although Hesburgh wanted to be a Navy chaplain ever since he was ordained in 1943, his path to chaplaincy was very indirect. “He took the long way around to becoming a navy chaplain,” Tidd said. Hesburgh said he was forced to set aside his desire to serve as a Navy chaplain in obedience to his vows as a member of the Congregation of Holy Cross. He instead obtained advanced degrees in and taught theology. Tidd said the inspiration to make Hesburgh’s dream come true all these years later began with Naval chaplain Fr. Bill Dorwart. Tidd said Hesburgh encouraged Dorwart, a member of Holy Cross, to become a Navy chaplain. He said it was Dorwart who then brought Hesburgh’s dream to Tidd’s attention and who suggested the possibility of making Hesburgh an honorary chaplain. Tidd said he was in favor of the idea, especially since he had met Hesburgh aboard the aircraft carrier USS Theodore Roosevelt. “I thought it was a great idea. I had personally met him aboard the Theodore Roosevelt and knew about his commitment to serving our Navy and Marines,” Tidd said. “Fr. Hesburgh has had a strategic impact on our nation. He has also had a personal impact on many people, including Fr. Dorwart.” Reflecting on the ceremony, Carter said he was glad Hesburgh received the honor and that Notre Dame’s Navy ROTC battalion could benefit from Hesburgh’s example. “I thought it was a faithful tribute to a very, very deserving leader,” Carter said. “I’m honored we were able to do the presentation in front of our battalion of midshipmen, since Fr. Hesburgh’s selfless service to the nation provides them with such a shining example as they look forward to their naval careers.” Tidd said the ceremony reflected both Hesburgh’s and the University’s history with the U.S. Navy. “It was a great way to celebrate his long connection to the navy and Notre Dame’s long connection to the navy,” he said. Sophomore midshipman Sam Hyder said the ceremony seemed to bring Hesburgh’s career back to where it had begun. “I thought it was pretty full circle for Fr. Hesburgh’s career that when he started as a priest he wanted to be a chaplain and now he is one,” he said. “I thought it was impressive he was faithful to both the Navy and Holy Cross.” Sophomore midshipman Kate Privateer said she was happy to be part of a ceremony honoring Hesburgh and to know about Hesburgh’s appreciation for the organization granting him the honor. “I’m really glad I could be part of a ceremony for Fr. Hesburgh because of what he has done for our country and for our ROTC battalion,” she said. “It’s great he could be honored by an organization he cares so much about.” Junior midshipman Murphy Lester said it was overwhelming to witness the ceremony. “I think there are so few people who have done so much to shape our nation and our University,” he said. “To be able to be here for this, to say I was there when they made Fr. Hesburgh a chaplain, is unbelievable. It’s beyond words.” Contact Christian Myers at cmyers8@nd.edulast_img read more

COVID-19 Farm Safety

first_imgWhile there is no evidence that the COVID-19 virus is a food safety concern, it is a worker health concern as it spreads via close person-to-person contact or by contact with contaminated surfaces.Food does not appear to be a likely cause of COVID-19 transmission, but many of the same practices used to prevent foodborne illness on foods should be used to reduce the likelihood of COVID-19 contamination on fresh produce and the risk of COVID-19 spreading among workers.Producers should educate workers on COVID-19 symptoms, how it spreads and how to reduce the spread of the disease.The following are guidelines from University of Georgia Cooperative Extension to share with employees:Instruct workers to stay home if they are sick (coughing, sore throat, fever, diarrhea, vomiting, etc.).Reassure employees that they will not be punished for missing work due to illness.Have a plan in place and communicate in advance how you will address workers who do not want to miss a paycheck (paid sick leave, etc.).All employees must wash their hands frequently throughout the day with soap and water for at least 20 seconds. This includes when employees arrive to work, before they handle food, after breaks or after using the restroom, etc.Disinfecting tools, equipment and surfacesDuring COVID-19, or any other outbreak situation, increase routine cleaning and disinfecting frequency to protect the health of workers. Disinfecting routines also need to include administrative offices, field trucks and break areas that are not generally included in day-to-day cleaning.Cleaning and disinfecting are two separate steps and should be done in order. Cleaning removes dirt and soil and often requires the use of a soap/detergent and water. Disinfecting uses a chemical to inactivate viruses on the surface.Following are guidelines for disinfecting items and surfaces:Clean and disinfect shared tools between uses by different employees.Use the CDC’s recommended use of disinfectants on the EPA list found at go.ncsu.edu/epacovid-19. (Note: this list is based on current data, but compounds have not been validated for inactivation of the virus causing COVID-19.)Bleach may be used to disinfect surfaces, but the concentration is higher for COVID-19 than for everyday sanitation: five tablespoons of bleach per gallon of water.Clean harvest baskets, bags, aprons, knives, etc. after each use. Wash fabrics with a detergent in hot water and apply a disinfectant to nonporous surfaces. See CDC guidelines on laundry at go.ncsu.edu/cdclaundry.Disinfect frequently touched surfaces — including door handles, steering wheels, keyboards, touch screens, etc. — throughout the day.Hygiene and personal protective equipmentHand sanitizing stations should supplement but not replace handwashing. Consider having sanitizer available for harvest or packing crews.Discourage employees from sharing phones, tools, utensils, vehicles, etc.Provide single-use gloves to all workers handling food. Gloves should be changed when contaminated (e.g. when hands touch skin or the ground). When gloves may interfere with a worker’s ability to do their assigned task (e.g. harvesting, applying stickers, etc.), handwashing or hand sanitizer should occur frequently.Some workers may prefer to wear masks while working in close proximity with others. Masks should be allowed but not required, and workers should be instructed on how to wear them properly to prevent illness or injury.Distancing and cohort monitoringInstruct workers to keep six feet away from each other. Limit one employee per vehicle at a time, and instruct drivers to disinfect frequently touched surfaces within the vehicle before their shift ends.When physical distancing is not an option, consider dividing workers into cohorts that only work with members within that cohort for the duration of the outbreak. For example, divide your packing crew into two groups that only show up for their group’s designated shift. Have the first shift clean and sanitize their work areas and equipment at the end of their shift and give a buffer of 15 to 30 minutes between the end of the first shift and beginning of the next shift to ensure employees are not in contact with each other during shift changes.Smaller operations may want to consider having designated harvest and packing crews, the members of which never cross paths during the work day. Employees in the same household should be assigned to the same crew or cohort. Cohorting reduces the risk of losing the entire workforce, which could happen if an employee who works at the same time as all of the other employees tests positive for COVID-19.For more information on COVID-19, visit cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov. For more resources on COVID-19 from UGA Extension, visit www.extension.uga.edu/emergencies.last_img read more