A SELECTIVE LIFE

first_imgShe’s sitting on the plane…it’s just five hours until the first manager’s meeting of the 2004 National Touch League begins. It’s just five hours until team registration sheets, selection availability sheets and statutory declaration forms begin to pile up on the desk in front of her. It’s just five hours until the questions begin, the excuses for missing forms begin, the unsigned sheets and the general chaos hits home….no need to continue. The thought is just way too daunting. It’s just five hours until…wait, what’s the air hostess doing to her? Man, it’s hot tea, spilled all down the front of her nice clean skirt. And so it begins… It’s the 2004 NTL’s and National Director of Selectors Cathy Gray is looking forward to 10 days of full time selection for National teams and squads. There’s selection for the Youth World Cup 20 years squads, the Australian Talent Identification Program (TIP), National Training Squads (NTS) and Australian Seniors teams. Everyone sees and knows the final outcome of the work that Cathy and her team of 22 other selectors and TI panel here, will do throughout the tournament. What no one really understands is exactly what these incredibly dedicated people will do to reach that final outcome. The selectors, along with tournament officials, will be the first at the fields every day. They will also be the last to leave. And when they get home, they might cook themselves some dinner and sit down with a cup of coffee or a glass of wine, but their folders will come back out and they’ll get back to work. Over the next 10 days these selectors will together watch around 500 games of touch, see around 1600 different players, fill out around 1000 assessment forms, lose around 100 pens, drink at least 2000 cups of coffee, get itchy legs from sitting on the grass, get sunburnt or drenched by rain (possibly both) and just sick of answering the same questions again and again and again. But they love it. And they wouldn’t be here if they didn’t. Just like players wouldn’t play, coaches wouldn’t coach and referees wouldn’t ref. Cathy Gray has been selecting for touch football since 1991, around 13 years now. She describes her journey to the position of National Director as sort of accidental. “I just sort of fell into selecting, they needed someone one day and I was there”, she says. “I ended up on the NSW selection panel, was invited to apply for the ATA selection panel, applied for the position of National Director and then I ended up here.” “The team of selectors we have are very positive and we have great working relationships with each other and the national coaches. There is a lot of trust on both sides.” It’s important for everyone to realise that for these selectors, this isn’t their only job. “We all have other jobs too, just like the players and coaches. Between touch selection and my teaching job I haven’t had a day at home in six weeks”, says Cathy. “The day after NTL’s finish I will be on a 6:30am flight home, I’ll be back just in time to teach my classes at Cheltenham Girls High school.” Despite the crazily hectic lifestyle that being a selector seems to throw at these guys, Cathy admits to absolutely loving what they get to do. “We love to do this, there’s a lot of great personalities in our group and in touch football in general and we enjoy each other’s company”, says Cathy. “To be honest, we just absolutely enjoy it. It’s a lot of work, but very rewarding. Seeing the way the Australian teams performed and what they achieved at the last World Cup makes all the hard work worthwhile. It was just such an honour to be there and be a part of everything.” So when you’re thinking about your NTL players this week or wondering how they’re doing, send up a quick prayer for our selectors who are working away behind the scenes. They deserve it. Rachel Moylelast_img read more

Rendon has 9 bills pass the Legislature

first_img Lawmaker closes 2013-14 session with 6 laws on the books and 3 awaiting the governor’s approvalLate legislative nights to close out Michigan’s 2013-14 House session were productive for state Rep. Bruce Rendon, who saw one bill signed into law and three more awaiting the governor’s signature before the end of the year. “I believe this has been a good term because I was able to successfully work on issues and ideas that our local residents were having, and get them fixed,” said Rendon, R-Lake City. “There are always more items to work on, so I’ll get back on them in the new year and also continue to listen to people’s concerns to be their voice in our government.” House Bill 5472 was signed into Public Act 373 of 2014, a law creating an alternative court track docket for individuals chronically behind in child support payments. Those with eligible medical, psychological, substance abuse, illiteracy, homelessness or unemployment conditions could qualify for an alternative compliance plan. Three other bills awaiting Gov. Rick Snyder’s consideration after the Legislature’s approval include:HB 4485, which addresses insurance licensing requirements and notifications for self-storage owners who only sell policies for stored property;HB 5036, that requires Michigan community colleges to inform applicants that military, National Guard or reserve service transcripts may qualify for class credit; andHB 5743 to allow all adoption hearings to be held in the same county where parental rights were terminated so the same judge can preside over the proceedings.In total, Rendon introduced 16 bills and seven resolutions in the House during his second term in office. Previous Rendon bills signed into law include revising qualified forest property tax rules; using military experience toward building license training qualifications; restructuring the state’s snowmobile advisory council; allowing optional ORV helmet use on private property, similar to snowmobile rules; and creating a college tuition assistance program for Michigan National Guard members. His resolutions, which all passed, indicated Michigan’s support of hunting and fishing rights, gun safety, Stand4Change, Hispanic Senior Citizens Day, America Recycles Week, Sons of the American Revolution Day and Hispanic Heritage Month. Rendon can be contacted by addressing letters to the State Capitol, Lansing, MI 48909-7514; calling his toll-free Lansing office number at 1-888-DIST-103 (1-888-347-8103); sending e-mail to brucerendon@house.mi.gov or visiting his online office website at www.RepBruceRendon.com. 22Dec Rendon has 9 bills pass the Legislature Categories: Rendon Newslast_img read more

Vivendi has fulfilled its ambition of taking its s

first_imgVivendi has fulfilled its ambition of taking its stake in Telecom Italia above 20%. The French media giant now holds a 20.03% stake in the Italian telco.“The group reitirates its intention to be a long-term shareholder of the Italian telecoms group and, more generally, to develop Vivendi’s activities in southern Europe,” Vivendi said.Vivendi has edged its participation in Telecom Italia up in stages since becoming the telco’s largest shareholder with a 14.9% stake in June, as the result of a share exchange related to its exit from Brazilian operator GVT. The company held 19.9% of the Italian telco’s capital by early October.last_img