At convention, children live their faith with song and enthusiasm

first_img Rector Shreveport, LA Director of Music Morristown, NJ At convention, children live their faith with song and enthusiasm Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Hopkinsville, KY Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Pittsburgh, PA Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Knoxville, TN Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Press Release Service Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Tags Associate Rector Columbus, GA An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Bath, NC Submit a Press Release The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group July 12, 2012 at 9:40 am Let us not lose the innocence and wide eyed, awestruck wonder that children have, especially in God, in His creation, and in His love for us. Jesus said, “…it is to such as these that the kingdom of heaven belongs.” Matthew 19:14b (NRSV) Rector Collierville, TN Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Martinsville, VA Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME center_img Submit a Job Listing Gail Stephens says: Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Washington, DC Featured Events Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR By Sharon SheridanPosted Jul 11, 2012 Comments (1) Rector Smithfield, NC Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Children, Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Belleville, IL Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Youth Minister Lorton, VA Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Curate Diocese of Nebraska General Convention 2012 Rector Tampa, FL Featured Jobs & Calls Comments are closed. General Convention, Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Submit an Event Listing Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Josie DeJesus, 10, said she loved everything about the Children’s Museum of Indianapolis. Here, she tries creating her own colorful work of art in an interactive exhibit as part of a display of blown-glass sculptures. Photo/Sharon Sheridan[Episcopal News Service — Indianapolis] They’re unlikely to sneak up on you. From “Rise and Shine” while they’re washing their hands to “Will the Circle be Unbroken” as they march down the hallway, camp songs herald the presence of General Convention’s children and their counselors.“I like the songs,” said Kayla Byrd, 10, of Haslett, Michigan. “I like the church songs.”While their parents and guardians have conducted the business of convention, infants through fifth-graders have participated in their own childcare and Christian formation program. The children’s ministries programs of the Episcopal Church and the Diocese of Indianapolis partnered with the diocese’s Waycross Camp and Conference Center, Episcopal Relief & Development and National Episcopal Health Ministries to offer the children’s program, which youngsters can attend for all or part of convention.As of the afternoon of July 7, about 30 had participated in some way, said Coordinator Caren Miles, director of children’s and family ministries at Church of the Heavenly Rest in New York.The program staff included experienced counselors and child-care professionals plus teens in training to become camp counselors. At Waycross, future counselors can take “leader in training” instruction, followed by a “counselor in training” program that includes hands-on work as a junior counselor, explained counselor Sean Cole.Miles’ goal in the program, she said, is for the children to feel that “this is my church and I belong at every level” and that they are “important enough for there to be something keyed to who they are right now, much like the [Official] Youth Presence is tailored to teens.”The program uses Episcopal Relief & Development’s Abundant Life Garden Project curriculum.“We’re talking about growth and everything around that when we’re in group time,” Miles said.One day, for example, they discussed the parable of the sower and listened to the Godly Play story of the mustard seed.The preschoolers did a dirt experiment, mixing various kinds of soil, rocks and water. “We shook it up, made it all mucky,” then waited for it to settle and separate into layers, said volunteer Beth Jeglum, who ran a university childcare program in Indianapolis for 25 years.The convention program also included field trips to Waycross and the Children’s Museum of Indianapolis for the older children.The museum, said Josie DeJesus, 10, of Peoria, Illinois, was “awesometastick.”“What’s the best part so far?”  asked teen volunteer Julia Long of Zionsville, Indiana.“Everything,” Josie replied. “I can’t choose.”Clearly, the museum was fun. But did it remind them of God?“In this room, not exactly because they’re talking about war with cannons and other gods, the pharaoh gods, when God says he’s the only God and to make peace,” said Robert Sanchez, 10, of Carmel, Indiana. But in the museum as a whole, yes. “It’s generating knowledge.”Josie agreed. “I keep learning new things, new stuff, and it’s really, really cool.”For 11-year-old Ryleigh Webley of Wyoming, Michigan, God was present in an exhibit about the herbs of Egypt. “They make me think about [how] some herbs will help the sick,” she said. “God can help treat people.”Before visiting the museum, the group ate lunch at Christ Church Cathedral. Program participants attend convention’s daily worship, and the counselors and older children discussed that day’s service during lunch.“I thought the [steel drum] band was really sweet because it’s not something you’d ever have in a church, at least my church,” said one girl.“I really liked the jazzy psalm,” said teen volunteer Joel Segner.“That’s funny. That was my least-favorite part,” said Miles, noting one of the great things about the church is that people can enjoy different things.“I liked reading,” said Robert, who had his first experience ever as church lector when he read one of the lessons.He also volunteered to bless the lunch: “God, thank you for this food, for everything you will give to us today. Amen.”Robert later confessed he initially was nervous about reading aloud in church, but he took his mom’s advice. “She told me that I’m doing it for God and that I didn’t really have to worry about anyone else. It felt good.”Robert’s 7-year-old sister Gloria said she enjoyed listening to the preacher, North Carolina Bishop Michael Curry.“I thought the priest was funny,” she said. “We normally don’t have priests like that at my church.”Robert and Gloria were among seven children on the museum trip, along with 10 teens receiving leadership training and three older supervisors.“It seems like the teenagers are getting just as much from their time with kids who just adore them,” Miles said. “I’ve just always loved to watch teenagers spend time with people who adore them and look up to them.”Emma Nickel, 16, of Indianapolis will be a Waycross counselor in training next year. She volunteered for the children’s program, she said, because “I wanted to help out, and I thought it would be really fun. … I love kids. I like being out with them, and it helps prepare me for when I am a counselor at camp.”Nickel is a youth steering committee member in the Diocese of Indianapolis, helping plan fall and spring retreats.“I have found most of my faith since I’ve been going to camp and being with other people, and just the way we’ve been able to learn about God has been easier to understand than just going to church,” she said. “I think it’s because they know how to talk to kids.”With the convention’s children, she’s fulfilling a similar role as those camp counselors who worked with her at camp. “We have learned how to learn about God and share that with them.”Said Segner, who turns 18 at the end of this month, “I definitely feel a spiritual connection with the kids. It’s nice seeing the younger kids having fun with their faith. It’s not just something they do in church. It’s also something they live and have fun with in their day-to-day life.“I’m really happy to be part of that.”— Sharon Sheridan is a member of the Episcopal News Service team at General Convention. Rector Albany, NYlast_img read more

Williams: Our ‘identity, destiny, calling’ is to live together in…

first_img Rector Washington, DC The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Anglican Consultative Council, Archbishop of Canterbury This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Albany, NY Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Pittsburgh, PA Tags Rector Bath, NC Director of Music Morristown, NJ Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Featured Jobs & Calls Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Submit a Job Listing Youth Minister Lorton, VA Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York center_img Rector Knoxville, TN Associate Rector Columbus, GA Curate Diocese of Nebraska Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Press Release Service Williams: Our ‘identity, destiny, calling’ is to live together in God’s love Eucharist interweaves three tikanga into experience of diversity Rector Hopkinsville, KY Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Anglican Communion, Rector Smithfield, NC Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Collierville, TN Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Submit a Press Release Submit an Event Listing Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Belleville, IL Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Tampa, FL By Mary Frances SchjonbergPosted Oct 28, 2012 The Anglican Consultative Council will begin its meeting in earnest Oct. 29 (local time) in Auckland’s Holy Trinity Cathedral where on Oct. 28 the members joined local Anglicans for Eucharist. ENS photo/Mary Frances Schjonberg[Episcopal News Service — Auckland, New Zealand] Archbishop of Canterbury Rowan Williams asked an overflow crowd at Holy Trinity Cathedral here Oct. 28 (local time) to pray that the members of the Anglican Consultative Council and all Anglicans would rediscover what it means to live out of the knowledge that God loves the world “without reserve and without condition.”A podcast of Williams’ sermon is available here and a transcript is here.The Eucharist came on the second day of the ACC’s Oct. 27-Nov. 7 meeting and was conducted in Maori, Tongan and English. Archbishops William Brown Turei, David Moxon and Winston Halapua, the three archbishops who lead the Anglican Church in Aotearoa, New Zealand and Polynesia’s three tikanga, presided.A boy waits to receive communion Oct. 28 at Holy Trinity Cathedral in Auckland from Tai Tokerau Bishop Te Kitohi Pikaahu. ENS photo/Mary Frances SchjonbergThe liturgy included traditional music as well as church music more oriented to Aotearoa New Zealand. Benedicté Aotearoa, for example, called on “you maori and pakeha, women and men, all who inhabit the long white cloud: All you saints and martyrs of the South Pacific” as well as “dolphins and kahawai [salmon], sealion and crab, coral anemone, pipi [mollusks] and shrimp … kiwi and sparrow” to “give to our God your thanks and praise.”Preaching on the day’s Gospel reading (John 15:17-27), Williams cautioned the congregation not to misinterpret Jesus’ words about the world hating those whom he has chosen as a simple dichotomy of the world hating Jesus and thus hating the church. Instead, he said, the passage contains “a very sharp challenge to the church; it’s not just about being able to console ouselves when people don’t like us.”That challenge, he said, is posed in the idea that the world’s love is conditional and is meant only for people who belong, “who are like you.” But the love embodied by Jesus and “the friends of Jesus” is meant for everyone, not reserved only for like-minded people.“It’s a love that perseveres when it is not returned,” Williams said. “It’s a love that is extravagantly poured out on the unlovable. Just in case you were wondering, the unlovable in this case is not them; it’s us.”Thus, he said, the challenge to the church is about “rethinking love, rethinking belonging,” instead of simply choosing who may belong based on whether they are well-liked and whether they can be expected to like us.Archbishop of Canterbury Rowan Williams spent time outside after the Oct. 28 Eucharist Auckland’s Holy Trinity Cathedral greeting worshipers, posing for photos with them and signing autographs. ENS photo/Mary Frances Schjonberg“We’ve got to go out and create more and more belonging with people who don’t belong,” the archbishop said, adding that the church must “unreasonably extend our welcome, our compassion, our joyful understanding to the entire world and live with the admittedly very messy consequences of that.”Williams said that the “Anglican family” gives thanks for the example of the Church in Aotearoa, New Zealand and Polynesia’s “struggle and achievement that Anglicans here have managed in holding together a deep sense of belonging … with each other and with the wider world.”Williams suggested that the church and its members can meet the challenge the Gospel presents by remembering that Jesus reminds his friends at the Last Supper that they have been with him from the beginning. “The beginning,” Williams said, is meant to be the beginning of time, not just the beginning of Jesus’ ministry.“God loved us from the beginning, before we belonged to anything, before we did anything, before we achieved anything, even before we believed anything, God was loving us. From the beginning we were there,” he said.Thus the whole world and all its inhabitants are equally bound together in the “immense mystery of God’s outpouring of himself in creation and in redeeming love,” he said, and there can be no division between the church and the world because “our identity, our destiny, our calling is held in that eternal act.”“It’s not that the love of God rewards us for what we do. It’s that the love of God makes us what we are. Our task is not to make ourselves loveable … our job is to create the belonging that God’s word wants, to bring online, to kindle into flame everywhere around us the acknowledgment of an unreasonable, universal, overwhelming love. That’s what the church is for.”The Rev. Linda Murphy, a vocational deacon at the Auckland City Mission, reads the Gospel Oct. 28 during Eucharist at Holy Trinity Cathedral. ENS photo/Mary Frances Schjonberg“The church is whatever in us says ‘yes’ to the reckless love of God, that reaches out in mission,” Williams said. That “yes”, he said, can be an antidote to the human tendency of “constantly trying to retreat from the awful implications of the Gospel.”The archbishop asked those present to pray that the ACC and all Anglicans will in the coming days have a “rediscovery as Anglicans of that mysterious sense of being there from the beginning,” and of the consequent commonality of having been enveloped in God’s “causeless” love from the very beginning.If Anglicans can recover that sense, “then our wonderful, quarrelsome, diverse, untidy Anglican Communion will testify in the spirit of truth that comes from the Father,” Williams concluded.ACC backgroundThe ACC is one of the four instruments of communion, the others being the archbishop of Canterbury (who serves as president of the ACC), the Lambeth Conference of Anglican bishops, and the Primates Meeting.Formed in 1969, the ACC includes clergy and lay people, as well as bishops, among its delegates. The membership includes from one to three persons from each of the Anglican Communion’s 38 provinces, depending on the numerical size of each province. Where there are three members, there is a bishop, a priest and a lay person. Where fewer members are appointed, preference is given to lay membership. The ACC’s constitution is here.The council meets every three years or four years and the Auckland meeting is the council’s 15th since it was created.The Episcopal Church is represented by Josephine Hicks of North Carolina; the Rev. Gay Jennings of Ohio; and Bishop Ian Douglas of Connecticut.Jefferts Schori is attending the meeting in her role as a member of the Anglican Communion Standing Committee, which met here prior to the start of the ACC meeting. Douglas is also a member of the Standing Committee.Previous ENS coverage of ACC15 is here.— The Rev. Mary Frances Schjonberg is an editor/reporter for the Episcopal News Service. Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Featured Events Rector Martinsville, VA Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MIlast_img read more

School shooting prompts prayers and new security reviews

first_img New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Smithfield, NC By Sharon SheridanPosted Feb 18, 2013 Gun Violence TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Belleville, IL Advocacy Peace & Justice, Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Knoxville, TN patrick Bone says: Rector Washington, DC Featured Jobs & Calls Associate Rector Columbus, GA This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Featured Events Submit an Event Listing February 18, 2013 at 6:08 pm G. K. Chesterton once said about British clergy, “some are so heavenly minded they are no earthly good.” We live in a time when we need to be “earthly good.” As a former law enforcment officer (there are a number of us who are priests in the Episcopal Church including a bishop), and a law enforcement chaplain for over thirty years (now retired), I suggest that there is nothing more effective in promoting school safety than an armed, uniformed, trained and certified law enforcement officer. There are many retired law enforcement officers (most retire at 25 years of service) who could be recruited for this duty. Money spent on such a person is like buying insurance. It is an expense until you need it! Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest The Episcopal Day School of Jacksonville in Florida is building a memorial plaza in honor of slain Principal Dale Regan. The plaza will protect the root structure of a 100-year-old oak on the school property that was a favorite of the educator, who worked at the school for 34 years. Photo/ Episcopal School of Jacksonville[Episcopal News Service] In the two months following the shooting death of 26 people, including 20 children, at a Connecticut elementary school, Episcopal schools have been examining and revising their security measures to keep students safe.“In general, the reaction has been … a review of safety procedures,” said Ann Mellow, National Association of Episcopal Schools associate director. “In some cases, depending upon the school, they haven’t changed anything because they feel very confident that they are doing the best they can to reasonably react to situations, knowing you can’t be prepared for everything all the time.“Other schools may have still had a relatively open campus and have added things. And I think certainly everybody’s got lockdown procedures,” Mellow said. “If they hadn’t already, they’ve added that to their many different kinds of drills that people do these days.”At some schools previously touched by violence, security measures already were under discussion before the fatal shootings at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown, Connecticut, on Dec. 14, 2012.In Florida, a Spanish teacher fired earlier in the day killed Episcopal School of Jacksonville head Dale Regan and then himself on campus on March 6, 2012.Following that shooting, said the Rev. Kate Moorehead, “the school has done a series of pretty serious security audits.”The school is always upgrading and looking at its security measures, but that was true even before the tragedy, said Moorehead, dean of St. John’s Cathedral in Jacksonville, which started the school, and vice chair of the school board of trustees. “We do have guards around the school as we’ve always had.” The shooter sneaked in, not entering through the gate, she noted. “Some things are just hard to prevent.”At St. John’s Parish Day School in Ellicott City, Maryland, the Newtown shootings prompted another round of review of security that already had been reassessed following a tragedy in that community seven months earlier.The school and the church with which it shares a campus, St. John’s Episcopal Church, provided support after a shooter shot and killed administrative assistant Brenda Brewington and critically wounded the co-rector at nearby St. Peter’s Episcopal Church and then killed himself near the church on May 3, 2012. The Rev. Mary-Marguerite Kohn died two days later.“That was just a devastating thing for the entire community. The staff of the church [at St. John’s] certainly felt vulnerable at that point,” said Steve Harrison, head of the day school. “It made us very mindful of security issues here on campus.”While the church installed security cameras in some buildings response, the school administrative staff “did not feel the same trepidation, nor did they really feel that they wanted to have a camera installed at the entrance” to its building, Harrison said. “So we didn’t.”After the Newtown tragedy, however, “everything changed.”Several years ago, the school had looked into security cameras and decided “it was too much of an intrusion,” he said. “Parents kind of felt it was too much of a Big Brother approach, and they just didn’t want it. Since Sandy Hook, we’ve had numerous discussions all over the campus community to try and determine what people are feeling, how they’re perceiving our needs now. Much of that has just taken a complete 180.”In the lower school, where doors open into classrooms, they are acquiring “jam bars” to secure the doors during a lockdown and are looking at coverings to use on the doors’ windows during those times. Doors to the early-childhood and lower-school wings with magnetic releases will remain locked, with manual releases on them, for lockdowns. And a new communications system is being installed, allowing for in-room announcements in a building that has had classroom phones but no interior public-address system.“All of this will be in place by start of school in September, most of it before the end of this academic year,” Harrison said.“The one piece that we did not and have not fully address yet is the outside entrance aspects of our building,” where the school has maintained an open campus with an unlocked door into the front lobby, he said. A security task force is evaluating the issue.Harrison anticipates installation of a buzzer system with a receptionist controlling entry from the lobby, which probably will mean installing video and audio monitoring at the entrance and likely also at a secondary entrance used by the school’s summer camp. Next year’s budget includes about $35,000 for a receptionist, he said.While he’d rather put that money toward hiring a learning support specialist, he said, “the necessity and the reality of life today is that this is an expectation the parents have … It’s not only on the minds of our current parents, but our perspective parents as well.”Prospective parents at open houses have asked about security arrangements at the school, Harrison said. “It’s sad, really, that we’ve had to go to this extent, and yet at the same time I think it’s a commentary on our time. … If I didn’t do it, I think we would lose certainly perspective students.”He noted, “Even though we’re an Episcopal school and have a sense of, I think, nurture and care that goes somewhat beyond what you might often find in some schools, there’s still no lack of trepidation amongst our parents about what will be going on here or potentially going on here, because it’s their kids, their pride and joy. They want to make sure that they’re safe regardless of how nurturing and caring the environment is. Safety trumps that.”Balancing concernsWhile Episcopal schools reviewed their security after the Newtown shootings, they also responded pastorally.“There’s been a very, very strong pastoral response and the notion of really drawing upon the strength of our community and our core principles as Episcopal schools, to not simply have it all be about fear,” Mellow said. “It’s a blended response.”Much of the schools’ focus “has been on pastoral care of families and children and faculty and sort of prayerful reflection,” she said. “What’s wonderful about Episcopal schools is that, because chapel and worship is a regular part of school life and schools have chaplains, schools have built-in ways for communities to come together and process, reflect, offer support and honestly be very prayerful about it.”On its website, NAES provided prayers, liturgies and links to resources for helping families deal with the Newtown tragedy. On Feb. 7-9 in Tampa, Florida, a conference NAES annually cosponsors with the Center for Spiritual and Ethical Education, whose mission is “to provide leading resources, expert voices and an active forum for ethical growth and spiritual development in schools,” focused on “Helping School Communities in Times of Tragedy.”The conference was planned a year ago, and it addressed both uncommon tragedies such as the Connecticut shootings as well as more common crises affecting school communities, such as the death of a student.“I actually think it’s much more common that … in the course of a school’s history, it’s going to go through the child who dies of cancer, the suicide of someone that everybody knows,” Mellow said.The keynote speakers included the Rev. Canon Malcolm Manson, head of Oregon Episcopal School in the 1980s when seven students and two faculty members died during an outing on Mount Hood, and the Rev. Hope “Hopie” Jernagan, chaplain at the Episcopal School of Jacksonville.“When we heard news of the Sandy Hook shooting, our hearts broke for them,” Jernagan said via e-mail after the conference. “We gathered for prayer on our plaza, praying for each of the victims and the shooter by name.”Also, said Moorehead, “the students made a huge card for the people of Newtown and for the school and wanted to communicate their compassion and be available to the people of Newtown if they needed us.“Certainly what they went through was in many ways much more difficult because children were killed,” she added.After the shooting last spring, the school immediately came together for prayer and community, Jernagan said. “In the days following the shooting, we cancelled all classes and activities but kept the campus open, knowing that students, parents, faculty and staff would want to be together. We also sought help from local clergy and counselors, who made themselves available on campus for pastoral care and counseling.“One of the things that really blew me away is just how many Episcopal clergy flocked to our campus, without even being asked, simply to be with us. We had clergy come not only from local churches but from as far away as Tampa, Tallahassee and Palm Beach.“Prayer was a very important part of our healing,” she said. “We prayed and continue to pray weekly for Dale Regan, her family and for [shooter] Shane Schumerth and his family.”“Although campus continues to grieve and heal from last year’s tragedy, we started this school year on a hopeful note, vowing to live out Dale Regan’s legacy each day,” Jernagan said. “We look to our weekly chapel services as our main way to wrestle with the many lingering questions and emotions.”The school faculty was “much more traumatized by the tragedy,” Moorehead said. “The students rebounded much more quickly, especially the younger children. The faculty, on the other hand, has been engaged in a deep grieving process that is really still going on and will be for a few more years.”Regan had worked at the school for 34 years, she said. “I did know her well, and it was hard for me. I miss her. She was a friend.”Similarly, the Rev. D. Scott Russell, Episcopal chaplain to Virginia Tech University, found himself pastoring people who responded differently and grieved at different rates after a gunman shot and killed 32 students and wounded 17 more people at the secular university on April 16, 2007.“The student body has turned over almost twice now. We’re getting students who remember [the shootings] from when they were in middle school,” said Russell, campus minister and associate rector of Christ Episcopal Church in Blacksburg, Virginia. “For them, they know about it and we have a memorial service every year on the anniversary, but it’s really becoming part of the school history rather than a fresh reminder. But for some of us, it seems like yesterday.”In the days and weeks following the shootings, he had to “let people be in different places,” he said. “That was quite a juggling act with my students. Some of them were ready to move on almost immediately. … Other students were just beginning to grieve.”Although it’s been almost six years since the Virginia Tech shootings, the Connecticut tragedy rapidly triggered emotional memories of “sheer shock and horror and wondering how we move forward,” Russell said.“For some of us who lost people we knew, it’s still pretty fresh,” he said.The Connecticut news also stirred compassion and commiseration with the Newtown community as it tried to cope and grieve in the media spotlight, he said. When the media descended on Virginia Tech after the April 16, 2007, shootings, “One student said to me it felt like we were having a family funeral, but the press was in our living room.”In Blacksburg, they talk about life before and after April 16. “It really was a defining moment in our community that changed us forever,” Russell said. “We’ll never go back to what it was like before. We’re different people.”Likewise, the Sandy Hook community has entered what the Virginians call “the new normal.”Adjusting to its own “new normal,” the Jacksonville school is building a memorial plaza to protect and preserve the roots system of the 100-year-old campus “Great Oak” that was a favorite of the slain school head.After much prayer and contemplation, the school turned the office where Regan was killed into a chemistry lab, Moorehead said. “They decided it was important to reclaim the space, but for something different.”“I think the community is not only growing and thriving, but we’re becoming something different because of what’s happened to us, which is much like the Resurrection,” she said. “When Christ came back, he was changed.”— Sharon Sheridan is an ENS correspondent. Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Tags Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Submit a Press Release Curate Diocese of Nebraska February 26, 2013 at 8:55 pm Slight clarification on the live oak tree being protected. Having lived as a child on the property now used as the Episcopal School, the age of the tree was listed as several hundred years old and the largest such tree in Florida if not in the South. I am glad it is being protected in memory of Ms. Regan. The property was the private winter estate of Asa Packer, willed to the cathedral [before its designation] and used for many years as a home for boys from broken homes. My father was the first canon of the cathedral and we lived in the former guest house of the estate. Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Fr. Fred Lindstrom says: Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Robert McCloskey says: Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Youth Minister Lorton, VA Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA February 21, 2013 at 8:03 pm After I left the Catholic Church (as a priest) and for years before I renewed my vocation in the Episcopal Church, I worked in and retired from a law-enforcement career. I am not a fan of weapons as the solution to violance. On the other hand, I have to agree with Fr. Lindstrom that a trained, uniformed and armed lawman is both symbolic and potentially effective in preventing the kinds of “revenge” killings perpretrated by unbalanced individuals who seem to be competing for attention by way of mass homocide and suicide. Homocide and suicide, in that order. As these mass killers seeks attention, they compete for the least protected and greatest number of victims before they kill themselves. If they have to shoot their way in, there is a greater probability they will look for another target. Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ School shooting prompts prayers and new security reviews Rector Hopkinsville, KY Comments (3) In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Albany, NY Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Pittsburgh, PA Director of Music Morristown, NJ Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Collierville, TN Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Shreveport, LA Comments are closed. Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Press Release Service Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Bath, NC Submit a Job Listing Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Tampa, FL last_img read more

Peter Lee nominated as bishop provisional for East Carolina

first_img New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Youth Minister Lorton, VA Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Collierville, TN Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Washington, DC Submit a Press Release Rector Smithfield, NC People July 1, 2013 at 6:28 pm Hi Harry,Just saw this. Send me an email to reconnect after how many years?John Rector Albany, NY Comments (3) Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Submit an Event Listing An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Featured Jobs & Calls Press Release Service Rector Tampa, FL Rector Bath, NC The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Peter Lee nominated as bishop provisional for East Carolina Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Submit a Job Listing Associate Rector Columbus, GA Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Belleville, IL Katerina Whitley says: Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Director of Music Morristown, NJ This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Pittsburgh, PA Bishop Peter Lee. Photo: Diocese of East Carolina[Episcopal News Service] The Rt. Rev. Peter James Lee has been nominated to serve as bishop provisional for the Episcopal Diocese of East Carolina, according to an announcement from the diocese.A formal election will be held March 9 when the 130th diocesan convention will convene at St. Paul’s Episcopal Church, Greenville, North Carolina.Bishops provisional are elected for an interim period until a diocesan bishop is chosen. Lee’s tenure as provisional bishop is expected to begin in early April and last approximately two years.The Rt. Rev. Clifton Daniel served as bishop of the East Carolina diocese for 15 years. He resigned on Feb. 28 to become bishop provisional of the Diocese of Pennsylvania.Lee, 74, retired in 2009 after serving for 25 years as bishop of the Diocese of Virginia. He since has served as interim dean of Grace Cathedral in San Francisco and of General Theological Seminary in New York. He currently is interim dean of the American Cathedral in Paris.“Bishop Lee is well known as a gifted Christian leader with outstanding experience as a leader in the Episcopal Church at home and abroad,” the Rev. Kevin A. Johnson, president of the Standing Committee for East Carolina, wrote in a letter to the diocese.“In times of conflict he has been a moderate who intentionally reached out to people in both wings of the denomination attempting to keep as many people around the table as possible. We believe that Bishop Lee will bring faithful service, skilled experience and dynamic leadership to our diocese as we continue in mission and ministry in the Diocese of East Carolina.”Lee has served as chair of the Church Pension Fund board; trustee of Berkeley Divinity School at Yale; chair for 17 years of the board of trustees for Virginia Theological Seminary in Alexandria; and board member for the National Alliance to End Homelessness.He also served on the advisory committee to the Anglican Observer at the United Nations and on the Presiding Bishop’s Fund for World Relief (forerunner to Episcopal Relief & Development).Lee was born in Mississippi and raised in Florida. After time spent in law school, as a newspaper reporter and as a military intelligence officer, Lee began his ministry at an urban cathedral in Jacksonville, Florida. After his diaconal year, he became an assistant at St. John’s Episcopal Church Lafayette Square in Washington, D.C.He was rector of Chapel of the Cross, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, from 1971–1984, the year he was elected bishop coadjutor of the Diocese of Virginia.Lee graduated magna cum laude from Washington and Lee University in Lexington, Virginia, and studied law at Duke University. He earned a master of divinity degree from Virginia Theological Seminary in 1967.He is married to Kristina Knapp Lee. They have two children and five grandchildren. Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Tags Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS May 11, 2013 at 11:56 am 11 May, Happy Birthday, from Harry Hooker Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Martinsville, VA Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY March 5, 2013 at 8:26 am My heart is always with the Diocese of East Carolina. Some of my happiest years were spent as editor of Cross Current. I wish both Bishop Lee and the members of the diocese a blessed season of work in God’s vineyard. By ENS staffPosted Mar 4, 2013 An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Shreveport, LA Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Comments are closed. Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Bishop Elections, Harry Hooker says: Rector Knoxville, TN John Gaither says: Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Hopkinsville, KY Featured Events Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OHlast_img read more

Hunger for food security, justice feeds Diocese of Los Angeles’…

first_imgHunger for food security, justice feeds Diocese of Los Angeles’ work Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Associate Rector Columbus, GA Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Bath, NC Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY By Lynette Wilson Posted Apr 6, 2015 Featured Events Director of Music Morristown, NJ Submit a Press Release Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Course Director Jerusalem, Israel The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Featured Jobs & Calls Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Knoxville, TN In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 April 6, 2015 at 10:26 am I belong to St. Andrew’s in Fullerton, Ca. W dug up our front lawn and made a beautiful garden! Since Andrew was a fisherman, we used small boats as raised beds! We grow all kinds of veggies and 100% of our food goes to local food banks. I can’t even describe the feelings that one gets when harvesting food and delivering it to people who truly appreciate it. Rev. Beth Kelly took Bishop Bruno’s request to heart, and she put his wishes into action. We have 5 teams that help maintain and plant and harvest every week. It’s a blessing. We are now known as the “church with all the boats.” I love being a part of a church that is truly doing God’s work! Come visit us some time! We would love to show people around and/or help them start gardens in their own church! Rector Martinsville, VA Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Submit a Job Listing An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud: Crossing continents and cultures with the most beautiful instrument you’ve never heard Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 Rector Shreveport, LA An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Albany, NY Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Shawn Cady says: New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Press Release Service Tags Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Pittsburgh, PA Comments are closed. Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Farmworker Ophelia Hernandez, Sarah Nolan, The Abundant Table’s director of programs and community partnerships, and Reyna Ortega, production manager, pose for a photograph in the field. Photo: Lynette Wilson/ENS[Episcopal News Service] Flying over Los Angeles, the city’s vastness comes sharply into focus. Its low buildings and sun-bleached concrete stretch on forever, but look closer at the greater metropolitan area, in the communities, schools and churchyards, and you’ll see gardens.The gardens are part of the Diocese of Los Angeles’ plan to address food security in the communities served by its parishes, and one of the ways it cares for the environment.In one of the nation’s largest cities in the top-producing agricultural state, people don’t have access to fresh fruits and vegetables. Through Seeds of Hope and The Abundant Table, the diocese is doing something about it.Three years ago, Los Angeles Bishop J. Jon Bruno decided to get serious about addressing food insecurity in his diocese and created Seeds of Hope, which works with congregations, communities and schools to turn unused land into productive gardens and orchards to provide healthy, fresh food to local residents.“In Los Angeles, access to nutritious food is a luxury,” said the Rev. Andrew K. Barnett, the bishop’s chair for environmental studies and food justice. “If you live in a low-income community, it’s much easier to get fast food.”The availability of fresh versus fast food has led to a 12-year life expectancy gap between residents of low-income neighborhoods and those who live in moderate-to-high-income neighborhoods, added Barnett.“We looked at that and said, ‘That’s unacceptable; that’s wrong.’”Up until the mid-1950s, “Los Angeles County was the main agricultural producing county … in the world,” said Tim Alderson, executive director of Seeds of Hope, in a Diocese of Los Angeles video. At the time of the diocese’s founding almost 120 years ago, 40 percent of the population was directly involved in agriculture.“Today, 1 percent of the population is involved in feeding the rest of us, which has created a real disconnect between us and the sources of our food, and that has led to obesity, diabetes, other metabolic disorders that affect us across the scale,” said Alderson.“We have people in our diocese who don’t know where their next meal is going to come from and those same people are obese.”Seeds of Hope takes a diocesan approach to producing and distributing food, and also serves to develop the resources necessary to empower parishes, schools and others to begin growing food. The intention is to make a direct impact on the health and wellness, both physically and spiritually, of people in the community.“Everything lands disproportionately on people living in poverty,” said Alderson in an interview with Episcopal News Service following a March 24 forum on the climate change crisis. “We decided we needed to address this serious issue in the underserved communities that we serve.”In contrast to other nations, Americans who live in poverty are more likely to be obese, and more likely to live in food deserts, or areas where access to fresh food is limited.Los Angeles County covers more than 4,000 square miles and is home to 10 million residents; 1.8 million, or 18 percent, live in poverty.The diocese – which stretches north to the city of Santa Maria, in Santa Barbara County, to San Clemente, the southern-most border of Orange County, east to the Arizona border, and west to the Pacific Ocean – covers a large geographic area and is home to 139 congregations, 40 schools and 20 institutions.Seeds of Hope Executive Director Tim Alderson harvesting oranges for the Cathedral Center food pantry. Photo: Courtesy of the Diocese of Los AngelesOne hundred and eight congregations participate in Seeds of Hope by either growing or distributing food or both, and half of its schools have gardens. Through a contract with the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health, it provides cooking/nutrition and fitness education to low-income residents at 17 churches in underserved communities, said Alderson.Since its inception in January 2013, Seeds of Hope has grown from one staff member to 16, including three full-time and three part-time positions, and 10 interns, and through combined efforts is producing 50 tons of fruits and vegetables – 800,000 servings – annually and is providing food to approximately 30,000 households monthly through food pantries.“We also serve more than 30,000 meals each month to people in need at our various meal programs,” said Alderson.Garden planting at Christ the Good Shepherd Episcopal Church in Los Angeles. Photo: Courtesy of the Diocese of Los AngelesNorth of Los Angeles, on 4.8 acres in Ventura County, The Abundant Table farm produces more than 50 varieties of fruits and vegetables, including beets, carrots, radishes, kale, chili peppers, tomatoes, lettuce, and cabbage.In addition to feeding the 150 members of their community-supported agriculture program, the farmers sell fresh produce to local schools and donate 10 percent of their harvest to a food bank.The Abundant Table is more than a farm, however; it’s also a church, an internship program, and a place where students, youth groups and others can gain a hands-on learning experience about food. Its mission is rooted in food justice – ensuring that people have access to fresh, nutritious foods, that farmworkers’ rights are respected and that the workers are paid a fair wage.“A foundational value of us is food justice,” said Sarah Nolan, director of programs and community partnerships.An ecumenical and interfaith ministry of the Episcopal and Lutheran churches, the farm church invites people of all faith traditions to explore spirituality in connection with the land.“We’re really looking at developing an ecosystem that creates an economically viable church and farm model,” said Nolan, adding that it’s experimental and that they are looking at how the farm supports worship and vice versa.Last year, The Abundant Table Farm Church received a $100,000 grant from an Episcopal Church initiative aimed at new church starts. The grant was funded through the Five Marks of Mission triennial budget. In this case, the Abundant Table Farm Church epitomizes the First Mark of Mission – to proclaim the good news of the kingdom.“Abundant Table is a community of practice that embodies a joyful and prophetic witness to the power of right relationships, not only to each other, but also with the land and with food,” said the Rev. Thomas Brackett, the Domestic and Foreign Missionary Society’s missioner for new church starts and missional initiatives, in an e-mail message.“[It models] wise actions that sustain intentional communities rooted in the ancient practices of following Jesus. It was the discernment of our First Mark [of Mission] funding council that we probably need 1,000 more Abundant Table ministries across the U.S. Sarah Nolan and Amy Grossman are out in front on a path that we will all need to eventually make by walking!”Last year, the Domestic and Foreign Missionary Society awarded Nolan an environmental stewardship fellowship through which she is working to build a national Episcopal network around food and agricultural ministries.“There are so many people doing things already,” she said, in addition to food banks and gardens. The Beecken Center of The School of Theology at Sewanee, for example, has created the Faith Farm and Food Network.One of the main questions she and others are asking is: “If The Episcopal Church looked at itself as a food system, what would we do differently?” Then subsequent questions might be: How would we use camps and conference centers differently? How would we connect churches with new and beginning farmers? How are food banks connecting with local farms? How does liturgy emerge out of what we are doing?In California, which is entering its fourth year of drought and where farmers have been forced to leave crops to rot in the fields, talking about food justice is an entry point for beginning discussions about ways to address climate change.“I think the power of connecting with where one’s food comes from and also participating in the growing process creates a relationship to the earth that forms a level of humility and wonder for God’s creation. In many ways, we know that it is difficult to express love and care for anyone or anything without a relationship,” said Nolan.“I don’t believe we can even begin to address the issues surrounding climate change, without developing a relationship to the earth and the people most impacted by the consequences of global warming,” she added. “I hope that every child, youth and adult that visits our farm experiences one step, if not more, in restoring a relationship with the plants, bugs, soil, people and all the complex relationships that make up our planet. For the Abundant Table it is the work of the church (especially a Eucharistic church) to help restore these relationships through the growing and sharing of food and invite others to join us in that work.”Editor’s note: Every Friday during these 30 Days of Action, we invite you to explore how the growing and sharing of food in your family, community and culture bring you closer God’s invitation to all of us to “till and keep” the earth.— Lynette Wilson is an editor/reporter for Episcopal News Service. Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Belleville, IL Rector Collierville, TN Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Poverty & Hunger AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Youth Minister Lorton, VA Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Washington, DC Comments (1) Submit an Event Listing Rector Tampa, FL Rector Smithfield, NC last_img read more

Tiny house ‘village’ for homeless developing with help of Montana…

first_imgTiny house ‘village’ for homeless developing with help of Montana church By David PaulsenPosted Mar 6, 2017 AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Submit a Press Release Tags Poverty & Hunger Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Bath, NC Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Patrick Wood says: Rector Belleville, IL Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Press Release Service Rector Albany, NY Rector Knoxville, TN New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Cathedral Dean Boise, ID March 7, 2017 at 4:00 am We cannot continue to avoid the issue with homeless individuals! At one time or another we are all down on our luck and I hope that other cities (Denver) get a clue and understand the importance of such a wonderful project not just for the homeless, but for all involved. This is a huge life lesson and I only hope those in Denver’s authority get a clue and assist rather than destroy as they have done in the past when this has been attempted. So many are in need especially ex-military, it is the least we could do to help them transition back into regular day to day life.May your program be a HUGE success and hopefully many other cities will learn from it. God bless and thank you for thinking of others as we should all be doing with today’s challenging world! A sketch of the proposed Housing First Village shows tiny houses grouped around a community resource center. Photo: Montana State University School of Architecture[Episcopal News Service] A coalition of Episcopalians, architecture students and social service providers in Bozeman, Montana, are in the middle of an innovative project that aims to address homelessness in the city – 155 square feet at a time.The concept is a village of tiny houses for the chronically homeless centered around a community resource center, where residents could receive counseling, medical assistance and employment help until they are able to move into permanent homes. Organizers still are looking for an appropriate site, but most of the other pieces of the project are falling into place as other groups and individuals in the community rally behind the idea.“Suddenly, this coalition has risen up that is excited about what we wanted to do,” said the Rev. Connie Pearson-Campbell, a deacon at St. James Episcopal Church in Bozeman who is one of the driving forces behind the planned Housing First Village.Sara Savage, housing director at Human Resource Development Council, or HRDC, called Pearson-Campbell a “PR hurricane” in drumming up support for the project. HRDC, a nonprofit community action agency, brings to the table years of experience proving shelter and services to the local homeless population.Montana State University is the third key player in the coalition. The School of Architecture created a course last fall in which students designed the tiny houses, and subsequent courses this year will help move the project through the regulatory and construction phases.“We realize it’s probably a couple of years, or at least a year, before we’d be able to move the first units onto a site,” architecture professor Ralph Johnson said. “These things don’t happen overnight. But we’re moving faster than most of the communities” that have attempted similar projects.Tiny houses are a big trend in the home-building world and in popular culture. Multiple reality TV shows have popped up to feature these small living spaces, even prompting some in the tiny house industry to debate whether such shows are good or bad for the “movement.”In that context, tiny houses are seen as a hip way to downsize your living space, but some communities, such as St. George, Utah, and Seattle , have shown that tiny houses can be tools for outreach to homeless or low-income populations.The Episcopal Church has its own share of examples. St. James Episcopal Church on the Standing Rock Reservation in North Dakota used a United Tank Offering grant to build tiny houses for students. And St. John’s Episcopal Church in St. Cloud, Minnesota, built a single tiny house to accommodate one homeless person on its property.What makes Pearson-Campbell and St. James Episcopal Church unique is they represent one leg of a three-legged stool supporting a mission that came together almost by accident.About 150 people are estimated to be homeless on any given night in Bozeman, and 30 percent are considered chronically homeless, a condition often tied to mental illness, substance abuse or other personal challenges, Savage said. Survival on the streets can be precarious, especially in Montana’s harsh winter months, and six homeless people were reported to have died in 2016 in Bozeman.The HRDC had been housing about 10 people at a time at a transitional living space called Amos House, but it was forced to close last July after losing a federal grant. St. James stepped up and offered an unused home on church property, called Canterbury House, allowing HRDC to convert it to housing for up to four homeless women.“I have to say, having one of our local faith-based partners look within their own resources … was so powerful and really made a direct impact on homeless women within a month,” Savage said.Separately, Pearson-Campbell said, she heard last summer from a friend about a tiny houses project in Detroit, and it got her thinking about trying something similar to address Bozeman’s homelessness problem.“I took one look at that and thought, oh my gosh, I think we can do this in Bozeman,” she said.She brought the idea up in a meeting with the city planning director in August. On her way out, she just happened to pass Johnson, the Montana State professor, who was on his way in to talk to the planning director on an unrelated matter. After introductions, a tiny house partnership quickly was formed.Johnson took the idea back to the university and, with two other professors, created the course that fall in which 12 students took on the task of designing the tiny houses.“I knew that within the School of Architecture there’s a strong moral ethic among students,” he said. “And so based upon Connie’s personality and her aspirations, I offered a class in small shelters for the city of Bozeman.”The result was two models, each just 155 square feet or a bit larger. One was designed to be accessible to people with disabilities. Each model featured a single bed, storage area, a shower and toilet, a compact refrigerator, a microwave, a sink and space for a chair.Residents could receive counseling, medical assistance and employment help until they are able to move into permanent homes. Photo: Montana State University School of ArchitectureThe students then created full-scale mockups from cardboard and tested them, including by inviting members of the homeless community inside. The semester concluded with an open house in December. More than 100 people came to see the models and learn about the project, Johnson said.Six students will build the first of the tiny houses in a new course this semester that also will address some of the regulatory hurdles. Bozeman’s building code, like building codes in many cities across the country, includes restrictions on lot usage, dwelling size and home layout that don’t easily accommodate tiny houses, Johnson said. His students will research options that can be presented to city officials.And then there is the challenge of finding an appropriate site for what eventually could be dozens of tiny houses and the community resource center. Savage doesn’t have any definite timeline for securing a site. Factors include cost, zoning and proximity to other residences.“Should the right parcel become available, we’d be able to move rather quickly,” Savage said. “But it will require some alignment of the stars, as it does with any major project like this.”As for construction cost, the materials needed to build each tiny house are estimated at $10,000 – or less, if any materials are donated.St. James has committed enough money to build one of the houses, and one of Pearson-Campbell’s tasks is to enlist more churches and community groups to give money or even assemble one of the houses themselves as a service project. Johnson’s students eventually hope to develop assembly instructions that will make it easy for those groups to build the houses themselves, similar to an IKEA furniture kit, Johnson said.The moral ethic Johnson sees in many of his students often materializes as a desire to build energy-efficient buildings, he said, but this project is built on a sense of social responsibility.“If this can give those who are homeless an opportunity to resolve the issues that place them in a homeless circumstance, we owe it to them to give them that opportunity,” he said.– David Paulsen is an editor and reporter for the Episcopal News Service. He can be reached at [email protected] Featured Jobs & Calls Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Hopkinsville, KY Comments are closed. Rector Smithfield, NC Course Director Jerusalem, Israel The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Dawn Underwood says: TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Martinsville, VA Submit an Event Listing Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Sara Marks says: Rector Washington, DC Rector Shreveport, LA Featured Events Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL March 7, 2017 at 2:57 pm I salute you and your ideas/work. Finally someone is doing something about the plight of the homeless, rather than just talking about it. I very much like both your “thinking and your doing”. I live in London Ontario Canada. I would love to see this idea imported up here. May Creator watch over you, protect you, and help you in this exceptionally worthwhile endeavour. Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ July 17, 2017 at 10:11 am Please don’t say that the military needs this help. These homeless people that say they are Veterans are lying. Why would we encourage more homeless people or encourage the ones living here to stay here. Sorry but Montana is not the right climate for being homeless. What message are we sending if we give away all of these homes to people unwilling to work (yes they are unwilling, look around any business in Bozeman- HELP WANTED signs everywhere!) And what about those people in Bozeman who can’t afford to live here and they are working 2 maybe 3 jobs to try to make ends meet? Instead of making this town like the place you moved from (California or Oregon), leave it the way it was. Please get your reality in check. Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Collierville, TN Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Comments (3) Submit a Job Listing Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Youth Minister Lorton, VA Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Tampa, FL Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Director of Music Morristown, NJ Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, MElast_img read more

Trinity Church Wall Street acquires Church Divinity School of the…

first_img Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Featured Events Theological Education Trinity Church Wall Street acquires Church Divinity School of the Pacific Partnership with East Coast historic church will mean firm financial footing, expanded offerings by West Coast seminary Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Featured Jobs & Calls This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Belleville, IL Rector Shreveport, LA Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Washington, DC New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Hopkinsville, KY Press Release Service Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA By Mary Frances SchjonbergPosted Mar 4, 2019 Rector Bath, NC TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Submit a Job Listing Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Submit an Event Listing In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Collierville, TN Rector Martinsville, VA Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Youth Minister Lorton, VA Curate Diocese of Nebraska Submit a Press Release An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Tampa, FL The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Albany, NY Rector Knoxville, TN Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Smithfield, NC Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Church Divinity School of the Pacific’s Berkeley, California, campus fills an entire block and is a mix of buildings from two centuries. Photo: Church Divinity School of the Pacific[Episcopal News Service] Church Divinity School of the Pacific, or CDSP, and Trinity Church Wall Street announced March 4 that the New York parish has acquired the Berkeley, California-based seminary.The Very Rev. W. Mark Richardson, CDSP president and dean, told Episcopal News Service in an interview that the deal will put the school on a solid financial footing and position it for growth. CDSP and its assets now belong to Trinity, he said, and the value of those assets “will be a fund, among other resources they have, that supports the program at the school and operation.”“It’ll be starting point of the kinds of funds we need to, say, augment faculty or to provide scholarship funding for students,” he said. “This becomes part of their assets that are poured back into the mission of the school.”Trinity sees CDSP as part of its strategy “to present and offer the curriculum that will bring new leaders into the world that can gather communities and resource them in a way that we have not been able to do currently,” the Rev. William Lupfer, Trinity’s rector, told ENS in an interview.Ultimately, Trinity and CDSP hope to add more faculty and an expanded curriculum that will train clergy and laity for a changing church, especially in the areas of leadership development, formation and community organizing. Making theological education more affordable is also a goal, church and seminary officials say. Both organizations hope to expand their current relationships across the Anglican Communion.“It’s going to strengthen and enhance our programming,” the Rev. Ruth Meyers, the school’s academic dean, told ENS. “Trinity has this history of not only doing work in leadership development but [building] relations around the Anglican Communion, and I think that’s really going to enhance the work we’re doing at CDSP.”The Rev. William Lupfer, Trinity Church Wall Street’s rector, left, and the Very Rev. W. Mark Richardson, Church Divinity School of the Pacific president and dean, announced the acquisition to CDSP students, faculty and staff on March. 4. Photo: Canticle CommunicationsTrinity Wall Street includes the church in Lower Manhattan, nearby St. Paul’s Chapel, and the Trinity Retreat Center in West Cornwall, Connecticut, as well as partnerships that involve housing for the elderly, the homeless and people with disabilities, among others. The parish also has a $6 billion portfolio that includes major real estate holdings, primarily in New York where it is both a developer and a landlord.The church’s vestry is now the seminary’s governing body. “But our vestry will not manage CDSP,” Lupfer said. “We will have staff members supporting the folks who are currently managing CDSP.”The Association of Theological Schools, the accrediting agency for all Episcopal Church-tied seminaries, has agreed to continue to accredit CDSP under the new governance structure. That means CDSP can continue to grant degrees. “CDSP is not going away,” Meyers said.Lupfer, Richardson and others involved in the discussions, which went on for close to 18 months and led to the agreement, told ENS that Trinity and CDSP expect to maintain the seminary’s current management, faculty and staff at the school for the near future. The current curriculum also will be maintained in the near term, they said.Lupfer and Richardson announced the agreement March 4 in CDSP’s chapel to students, faculty and staff. That gathering began two days of meetings and question-and-answer sessions with Lupfer, Richardson, faculty and CDSP and Trinity senior staff.Quoting the spiritual that says, “I got a home up in that kingdom, ain’t that good news,” Presiding Bishop Michael Curry said in an emailed statement that the agreement “is not simply a matter of institutional rearrangement.”“That would be news. But this is more than news. This is good news in the biblical meaning of that phrase. For this is about a creative relationship that will enable the seminary to train and form leaders for a church daring to be more than merely an institution,” Curry said. “This is about forming leaders for a Jesus movement committed to living, proclaiming and witnessing to his way and message of unconditional, unselfish, sacrificial liberating love. That movement changed lives and the world in the first century, and it can do it again in the 21st century. This new relationship helps to form leaders for that. And that is truly good news!”The Rev. Gay Clark Jennings, president of the House of Deputies, also praised the agreement.“I’ve just returned from serving as St. Margaret’s Visiting Professor of Women in Ministry at CDSP, where I met students and faculty with the fresh energy and ideas we need in the 21st-century church,” she said in a statement emailed to ENS. “This new alliance between CDSP and Trinity Church Wall Street is a visionary and innovative way to pair that energy with resources and partnerships that span the globe, all in the service of the gospel. Our church needs just the kind of leaders that this partnership will provide.”The campus of Church Divinity School of the Pacific in Berkeley, California, is just north of the University of California, Berkeley. Photo: Church Divinity School of the PacificCDSP, founded in 1893, is one of 10 seminaries with ties to The Episcopal Church. It is not the first of those schools to change its ways of being in order to survive the economic challenges facing all small graduate schools, and seminaries in particular. In 2012, Bexley Seabury Seminary was formed through a federation of two Episcopal seminaries, Bexley Hall Seminary in Columbus, Ohio, and Seabury-Western Theological Seminary in Chicago.In 2017, Episcopal Divinity School announced it would be closing its Cambridge, Massachusetts, campus and entering an affiliation agreement with Union Theological Seminary in New York. The new entity is called Episcopal Divinity School at Union. Earlier this year, EDS at Union said it had begun a long-term lease for its remaining Cambridge property with The Church in Cambridge. The move was the latest in a process that began in March 2008 when the seminary sought to secure its financial future by entering a partnership with Lesley University, in which Lesley bought seven of the 13 buildings EDS owned on its eight-acre campus.Request of advice led to agreementTrinity and CDSP did not set out to strike an acquisition deal. “It started by accident, frankly,” Richardson said. He and then-trustees chair Don White had turned to Trinity for advice when the school was considering how it might capitalize on its parking lot, one of the few nominally empty spaces in the neighborhood just north of the University of California, Berkeley.“We seemed to have started at an inspirational moment,” Richardson said. “They knew we weren’t there to get into their pocketbook. We just really had some things we needed to do and knew they had the expertise.”Richardson said the seminary would base any potential development on the goals of adding value to the neighborhood, providing income for the school and driving mission.“It’s got to meet all three, or it’s not serving the school’s long-term history and needs,” he said he told Lupfer and others.The rector replied that he and Trinity take an even broader, more holistic approach to such questions. The conversation eventually left the parking lot behind as its scope widened.Trinity, Lupfer said, has always looked at land “as an economic opportunity that needs to be activated” for broader, missional uses. Thus, the parking lot conversation evolved into a recognition that Trinity has cash and CDSP has “all this intellectual power, and it’s aligned in the ways in which we are interested in,” Lupfer said, including leadership development, formation and community organizing.The Church Divinity School of the Pacific campus sits on what is known as Holy Hill, which has views of San Francisco Bay. Photo: Google MapsThe “inspirational” part of the agreement was striking to CDSP alumnus and trustee, the Rev. Brendan Barnicle. A stock analyst and investment banker who had seen “lots of deals over the years” before he went to seminary, Barnicle said that, as he watched “the dialogue and the way this was being done, maybe not surprisingly, I’d never seen a deal where the Holy Spirit was so apparent because there was so much new and creative about this.”Barnicle, of St. Stephen’s Episcopal Church in Portland, Oregon, added, “If we expect parishioners to think about how they steward their resources, then we, as the church, need to be a model, and I think that is what CDSP is doing by entering into this relationship.”The faculty soon became part of the conversations about a possible deal. “This is different from some of the other seminary drama that we have had in the last few years in that the faculty are really on board,” Meyers said.A member of the faculty sat on the CDPS board and joined in the deliberations. Input from those representatives has been “welcomed and well received by other member of the board,” Meyers said. The faculty had been “listened to and attended to” during the conversations and negotiations, she added.Kathleen Moore, a CDSP senior whom the student body elected as ombudsperson for this academic year, told ENS she was “pretty excited when I heard about it, and I am still pretty excited.” Moore represented students’ interests on the Board of Trustees and elsewhere, and she said she told her trustee colleagues that the deal is an instance of CDSP “putting into practice what it teaches and preaches” about adaptive change.Barnicle acknowledged, “It’s risky to make a change like this and to potentially give up some of the control and authority and what not; yet, as we think about the church going forward, being willing to take those kinds of risks are some of the things I think that we are called to do.”Moore said she has learned at CDSP “to look at those unknowns with an open mind, an excited mind, and we have a scriptural basis for this kind of thing to go forward not knowing exactly what’s going to happen but having trust.”The details of the new arrangement will be worked out, Richardson said, “as we stumble over ourselves and learn from our mistakes and then pick up a start again.”Richardson said, “I think the church knows, as a whole, that we need innovation in theological education and in the church, period. Innovation, when it’s true, is often disruptive. All of that will be part of the story moving forward.”Lupfer agreed. “Being iterative and being open to the future and to learning together and experimenting is a critical part of today’s world,” he said. “We would not want to be with someone who had the illusion of certainty of the future.”Trinity Church Wall Street is in the midst of a two-year rejuvenation project, the first in decades. The updates are intended to enhance the overall worship experience, make spaces accessible and welcoming, upgrade technology and infrastructure and address deferred maintenance. Photo: Trinity Church Wall Street via FacebookOne of those unknowns is how alumni and other donors will react to the news. Will they think they no longer have to give because of Trinity’s wealth? “What we hope is that people will see this as a strengthening of the seminary and still be able to give to the focused programming of CDSP,” Meyers said, explaining that focus might also apply to scholarship funds and faculty chair endowments. “There’s still going to be continuing need. We are one tiny part of the Trinity budget.”The agreement also represents a significant change in each organization’s culture. Combine one of the oldest institutions in The Episcopal Church with a seminary in the West created to serve the West and there will be “amazing contrasts,” Richardson said, including a big staff at Trinity and a “small, scrappy school that has a fraction of that.” Yet, both Richardson and Lupfer said their institutions are geared toward the missional work of the church in the world.And, Lupfer said, Trinity is not aiming to compete with the other Episcopal Church-connected seminaries.“We see this as additive for everyone,” Lupfer said, who spoke to ENS right after meeting with the dean of another seminary and assuring him of Trinity’s ongoing contributions to that school’s capital campaign and annual fund drive.“If there’s any bulking up at CDSP, which of course we would expect, that would probably happen with international students or students who would not go to a residential seminary without financial aid,” he said. “We don’t see ourselves competing for students with other the other seminaries. And we see ourselves cooperating with the other seminaries around curriculum areas that we’re interested in.”– The Rev. Mary Frances Schjonberg is the Episcopal News Service’s senior editor and reporter. Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Director of Music Morristown, NJ Tags Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Pittsburgh, PA The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GAlast_img read more

Australian bishop: We must rise to the challenge of the…

first_imgAustralian bishop: We must rise to the challenge of the climate emergency Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Bishop Philip Huggins, president of the National Council of Churches in Australia. Photo: Ivars Kupcis/WCC[World Council of Churches] At the the 57th session of the World Council of Churches (WCC) Commission of Churches on International Affairs in Brisbane, Australia, Bishop Philip Huggins of the Anglican Church of Australia thoughtfully summed up why this year is a crucial one for the planet.“We are well aware that this is the year the Paris Agreement comes up for substantial contribution by each nation,” said Huggins, president of the National Council of Churches in Australia. “It’s a bottom-up process. It’s a very democratic process.”Read the full article here. Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Anglican Communion, Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Tampa, FL Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Collierville, TN Rector Hopkinsville, KY Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Bath, NC Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Press Release Service Rector Shreveport, LA Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Associate Rector Columbus, GA Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Submit an Event Listing Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Featured Jobs & Calls Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Knoxville, TN Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Smithfield, NC center_img Curate Diocese of Nebraska Director of Music Morristown, NJ Posted Feb 28, 2020 Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Submit a Press Release Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Submit a Job Listing New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Environment & Climate Change Rector Belleville, IL Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Washington, DC Youth Minister Lorton, VA Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Martinsville, VA Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Albany, NY Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Featured Events Tagslast_img read more

Talk to State Rep. Jennifer Sullivan’s staff this month

first_img LEAVE A REPLY Cancel reply Florida gas prices jump 12 cents; most expensive since 2014 Coming to Apopka City Hall in OctoberJennifer SullivanState Representative Jennifer Sullivan’s staff will hold office hours at Apopka City Hall on Tuesday, October 24th, 2017 from 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. for constituent outreach.  Please call Morgan Hatfield at 352-742-6275 for an appointment.If you need immediate assistance, please visit or contact our Eustis office located at 2755 South Bay Street, Unit D, Eustis 32726, Monday through Friday from 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.  You may also contact our office at 352-742-6275.If you live north of 441 you are most likely in District 31 and Jennifer Sullivan is your State Representative in Tallahassee.Sullivan is in her second term in the Florida Legislature after decisive wins in 2014, and 2016. She is the Majority Deputy Whip. Please enter your name here UF/IFAS in Apopka will temporarily house District staff; saves almost $400,000 TAGSJennifer Sullivan Previous articleAgrusa brings intensity, optimism, and politics to ChamberNext articleHurricane Irma spreads 2.2 trillion gallons of water across the district Denise Connell RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Share on Facebook Tweet on Twitter Gov. DeSantis says new moment-of-silence law in public schools protects religious freedom Please enter your comment! You have entered an incorrect email address! Please enter your email address here Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment.last_img read more

How to Choose The Best Backpack for Your Child

first_imgShare on Facebook Tweet on Twitter From Florida Hospital – Apopka Please enter your name here LEAVE A REPLY Cancel reply You have entered an incorrect email address! Please enter your email address here The Anatomy of Fear TAGSBackpackChildrenFlorida Hospital – Apopka Previous articleAmusing Ourselves to DeathNext articleApopka High School alumnus directs traffic Denise Connell RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Please enter your comment! Right Shape and SizeSure, it’s fun to pick a pack that expresses your child’s personality – from cartoon characters to color to fun designs. It’s even more important to choose one that‘s the right size and shape for their bodies and what they need to carry. So, if you’ve got younger students, be sure to select a smaller backpack instead of one that’s too large.   Don’t Overload ItMany kids involved in afterschool activities carry their backpacks from early morning until late evening. And if their carrying sports equipment or a laptop, it just adds to that load.While backpacks are necessary, overweight or improperly fitted ones can cause joint and muscle strain, leading to neck, back and shoulder pain. Children who routinely carry heavy backpacks also may experience circulation or nerve issues, as well as problems with posture.Preventing and Treating Backpack InjuriesWhen kids use an overly heavy backpack, they may arch their back or lean forward to compensate for the extra weight, which can cause stress on the spine and lead to various levels of discomfort. Tight or weighed-down backpack straps may pose a problem as well, as pressure from the straps can compress the supraclavicular nerve over the top of the shoulder blade, causing pain. “The most common problems are shoulder, back and neck pain,” says Woo. Most of these problems are due to overweight, undersized/oversized or poorly designed backpacks, or improper wearing, such as when they sling one strap over their shoulder.Wear the Pack CorrectlyDr. Woo recommends backpacks with camping-pack type features, such as thick padded shoulder straps, a chest strap, or a hip belt. These help spread the backpack’s weight evenly on the shoulders and hips. Be sure to use both straps, and don’t sling the pack over one shoulder.Consider Specific Features or Alternative BagsIf this style isn’t appealing, Woo suggests a messenger bag, a rolling backpack, or even using alternate sets of books for home and school to avoid weight-related stress or pain. Store the heaviest items – laptops, books, binders – on the bottom, closest to their back. If they take a water bottle to school, don’t fill it until they get to school, to keep the weight down.Scoliosis Risk: Fact or Fiction?It‘s a misconception that overweight backpacks cause scoliosis, a curvature of the spine. According to Dr. Woo, “There are no scientific articles that support this notion, and many dispel this theory.” So the good news is, you don’t need to worry about your children developing the condition from using a heavy backpack. Keep in mind, though, that spinal stress from an overweight backpack can affect your child’s posture.Backpack Buyer’s GuideIf you’re still not sure if a certain backpack is right for your child, Dr. Woo offers a few basic guidelines to follow: –       Always buy a pack that is appropriately sized for your kids.–       Make sure their backpack doesn’t weigh more than 5 to 7 percent of their body weight.–       Look for brands that offer lifetime guarantees on workmanship, or produce similar packs for backpacking and camping. Back-to-school shopping is just around the corner, but before you rush out and buy the cutest backpack off the shelf, keep practicality in mind. Raymund Woo, MD, pediatric orthopedic surgeon at Florida Hospital, shares what you need to know when choosing a backpack. Free webinar for job seekers on best interview answers, hosted by Goodwill June 11 Support conservation and fish with NEW Florida specialty license plate Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment.last_img read more