Zenith Bank PLC (ZENITH.ng) HY2011 Interim Report

first_imgZenith Bank PLC (ZENITH.ng) listed on the Nigerian Stock Exchange under the Banking sector has released it’s 2011 interim results for the half year.For more information about Zenith Bank PLC (ZENITH.ng) reports, abridged reports, interim earnings results and earnings presentations, visit the Zenith Bank PLC (ZENITH.ng) company page on AfricanFinancials.Document: Zenith Bank PLC (ZENITH.ng)  2011 interim results for the half year.Company ProfileZenith Bank Plc is a financial services institution in Nigeria offering banking products and services for the personal, commercial, corporate, private and investment banking sectors. The company also offers non-banking services such as foreign exchange, treasury, trade services and cash management services. Its full-service offering ranges from transactional accounts, savings accounts and deposits to short term investment funds, association accounts, personal funds management, funds transfer service and import letters of credit. Established in 1990 and formerly known as Zenith International Bank Limited, the company changed its name to Zenith Bank Plc in 2004. The company has three subsidiaries: Zenith Bank (Ghana) Limited and Zenith Bank (Sierra Leone) and Zenith Bank (Gambia) Limited. It has representative offices in South Africa and The People’s Republic of China. Its company head office is in Lagos, Nigeria. Zenith Bank Plc is listed on the Nigerian Stock Exchangelast_img read more

Conoil Plc (CONOIL.ng) 2013 Annual Report

first_imgConoil Plc (CONOIL.ng) listed on the Nigerian Stock Exchange under the Energy sector has released it’s 2013 annual report.For more information about Conoil Plc (CONOIL.ng) reports, abridged reports, interim earnings results and earnings presentations, visit the Conoil Plc (CONOIL.ng) company page on AfricanFinancials.Document: Conoil Plc (CONOIL.ng)  2013 annual report.Company ProfileConoil Plc is a petroleum exploration and production company in Nigeria that extracts, produces and sells crude oil as well as supplies a range of lubricants and household and liquefied petroleum gas for use by the domestic and industrial sectors. The company supplies what is referred to as White products, which is premium motor spirts, aviation turbine kerosene, dual purpose kerosene, low-pour fuel oil and automotive gasoline/grease oil. Products in its lubricant range include transport lubricants, industrial lubricants, greases, process oil and bitumen. Products in its liquefied petroleum gas range include liquefied petroleum gas sold in bulk, gas-packed, cylinders and valves. Established in 1984 and formerly known as Consolidated Oil Nigeria Limited, the company changed its name to Conoil Producing Plc. The company has exploration licenses for 6 highly prospective blocks in the Niger Delta which it acquired and paid for after competitive bidding rounds organised by the Federal Government of Nigeria. Conoil Producing has discovered hydrocarbon offshore southeast of Niger Delta and initial logging interpretations is looking promising. Conoil Plc’s head office is in Lagos, Nigeria. Conoil Plc is listed on the Nigerian Stock Exchangelast_img read more

Mwalimu Commercial Bank Plc (MCB.tz) 2020 Abridged Report

first_imgMwalimu Commercial Bank Plc (MCB.tz) listed on the Dar es Salaam Stock Exchange under the Banking sector has released it’s 2020 abridged results.For more information about Mwalimu Commercial Bank Plc (MCB.tz) reports, abridged reports, interim earnings results and earnings presentations, visit the Mwalimu Commercial Bank Plc (MCB.tz) company page on AfricanFinancials.Document: Mwalimu Commercial Bank Plc (MCB.tz)  2020 abridged results.Company ProfileMwalimu Community Bank Limited (MCB) is a commercial bank which is wholly-owned and promoted by an umbrella trade union of teachers in Tanzania. Tanzania Teacher’s Union (TTU) is a trade union established under the Employment and Labour Relations Act 2004. There are over 200 000 members across all regions in the country. MCB meets an important need to provide affordable and accessible banking products and services to teachers in Tanzania. MCB offers a diverse range of products and services geared to empower teachers and other civil servants to improve their living conditions and transform their lives. Mwalimu Community Bank Limited is listed on the Dar es Salaam Stock Exchangelast_img read more

School shooting prompts prayers and new security reviews

first_img New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Smithfield, NC By Sharon SheridanPosted Feb 18, 2013 Gun Violence TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Belleville, IL Advocacy Peace & Justice, Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Knoxville, TN patrick Bone says: Rector Washington, DC Featured Jobs & Calls Associate Rector Columbus, GA This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Featured Events Submit an Event Listing February 18, 2013 at 6:08 pm G. K. Chesterton once said about British clergy, “some are so heavenly minded they are no earthly good.” We live in a time when we need to be “earthly good.” As a former law enforcment officer (there are a number of us who are priests in the Episcopal Church including a bishop), and a law enforcement chaplain for over thirty years (now retired), I suggest that there is nothing more effective in promoting school safety than an armed, uniformed, trained and certified law enforcement officer. There are many retired law enforcement officers (most retire at 25 years of service) who could be recruited for this duty. Money spent on such a person is like buying insurance. It is an expense until you need it! Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest The Episcopal Day School of Jacksonville in Florida is building a memorial plaza in honor of slain Principal Dale Regan. The plaza will protect the root structure of a 100-year-old oak on the school property that was a favorite of the educator, who worked at the school for 34 years. Photo/ Episcopal School of Jacksonville[Episcopal News Service] In the two months following the shooting death of 26 people, including 20 children, at a Connecticut elementary school, Episcopal schools have been examining and revising their security measures to keep students safe.“In general, the reaction has been … a review of safety procedures,” said Ann Mellow, National Association of Episcopal Schools associate director. “In some cases, depending upon the school, they haven’t changed anything because they feel very confident that they are doing the best they can to reasonably react to situations, knowing you can’t be prepared for everything all the time.“Other schools may have still had a relatively open campus and have added things. And I think certainly everybody’s got lockdown procedures,” Mellow said. “If they hadn’t already, they’ve added that to their many different kinds of drills that people do these days.”At some schools previously touched by violence, security measures already were under discussion before the fatal shootings at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown, Connecticut, on Dec. 14, 2012.In Florida, a Spanish teacher fired earlier in the day killed Episcopal School of Jacksonville head Dale Regan and then himself on campus on March 6, 2012.Following that shooting, said the Rev. Kate Moorehead, “the school has done a series of pretty serious security audits.”The school is always upgrading and looking at its security measures, but that was true even before the tragedy, said Moorehead, dean of St. John’s Cathedral in Jacksonville, which started the school, and vice chair of the school board of trustees. “We do have guards around the school as we’ve always had.” The shooter sneaked in, not entering through the gate, she noted. “Some things are just hard to prevent.”At St. John’s Parish Day School in Ellicott City, Maryland, the Newtown shootings prompted another round of review of security that already had been reassessed following a tragedy in that community seven months earlier.The school and the church with which it shares a campus, St. John’s Episcopal Church, provided support after a shooter shot and killed administrative assistant Brenda Brewington and critically wounded the co-rector at nearby St. Peter’s Episcopal Church and then killed himself near the church on May 3, 2012. The Rev. Mary-Marguerite Kohn died two days later.“That was just a devastating thing for the entire community. The staff of the church [at St. John’s] certainly felt vulnerable at that point,” said Steve Harrison, head of the day school. “It made us very mindful of security issues here on campus.”While the church installed security cameras in some buildings response, the school administrative staff “did not feel the same trepidation, nor did they really feel that they wanted to have a camera installed at the entrance” to its building, Harrison said. “So we didn’t.”After the Newtown tragedy, however, “everything changed.”Several years ago, the school had looked into security cameras and decided “it was too much of an intrusion,” he said. “Parents kind of felt it was too much of a Big Brother approach, and they just didn’t want it. Since Sandy Hook, we’ve had numerous discussions all over the campus community to try and determine what people are feeling, how they’re perceiving our needs now. Much of that has just taken a complete 180.”In the lower school, where doors open into classrooms, they are acquiring “jam bars” to secure the doors during a lockdown and are looking at coverings to use on the doors’ windows during those times. Doors to the early-childhood and lower-school wings with magnetic releases will remain locked, with manual releases on them, for lockdowns. And a new communications system is being installed, allowing for in-room announcements in a building that has had classroom phones but no interior public-address system.“All of this will be in place by start of school in September, most of it before the end of this academic year,” Harrison said.“The one piece that we did not and have not fully address yet is the outside entrance aspects of our building,” where the school has maintained an open campus with an unlocked door into the front lobby, he said. A security task force is evaluating the issue.Harrison anticipates installation of a buzzer system with a receptionist controlling entry from the lobby, which probably will mean installing video and audio monitoring at the entrance and likely also at a secondary entrance used by the school’s summer camp. Next year’s budget includes about $35,000 for a receptionist, he said.While he’d rather put that money toward hiring a learning support specialist, he said, “the necessity and the reality of life today is that this is an expectation the parents have … It’s not only on the minds of our current parents, but our perspective parents as well.”Prospective parents at open houses have asked about security arrangements at the school, Harrison said. “It’s sad, really, that we’ve had to go to this extent, and yet at the same time I think it’s a commentary on our time. … If I didn’t do it, I think we would lose certainly perspective students.”He noted, “Even though we’re an Episcopal school and have a sense of, I think, nurture and care that goes somewhat beyond what you might often find in some schools, there’s still no lack of trepidation amongst our parents about what will be going on here or potentially going on here, because it’s their kids, their pride and joy. They want to make sure that they’re safe regardless of how nurturing and caring the environment is. Safety trumps that.”Balancing concernsWhile Episcopal schools reviewed their security after the Newtown shootings, they also responded pastorally.“There’s been a very, very strong pastoral response and the notion of really drawing upon the strength of our community and our core principles as Episcopal schools, to not simply have it all be about fear,” Mellow said. “It’s a blended response.”Much of the schools’ focus “has been on pastoral care of families and children and faculty and sort of prayerful reflection,” she said. “What’s wonderful about Episcopal schools is that, because chapel and worship is a regular part of school life and schools have chaplains, schools have built-in ways for communities to come together and process, reflect, offer support and honestly be very prayerful about it.”On its website, NAES provided prayers, liturgies and links to resources for helping families deal with the Newtown tragedy. On Feb. 7-9 in Tampa, Florida, a conference NAES annually cosponsors with the Center for Spiritual and Ethical Education, whose mission is “to provide leading resources, expert voices and an active forum for ethical growth and spiritual development in schools,” focused on “Helping School Communities in Times of Tragedy.”The conference was planned a year ago, and it addressed both uncommon tragedies such as the Connecticut shootings as well as more common crises affecting school communities, such as the death of a student.“I actually think it’s much more common that … in the course of a school’s history, it’s going to go through the child who dies of cancer, the suicide of someone that everybody knows,” Mellow said.The keynote speakers included the Rev. Canon Malcolm Manson, head of Oregon Episcopal School in the 1980s when seven students and two faculty members died during an outing on Mount Hood, and the Rev. Hope “Hopie” Jernagan, chaplain at the Episcopal School of Jacksonville.“When we heard news of the Sandy Hook shooting, our hearts broke for them,” Jernagan said via e-mail after the conference. “We gathered for prayer on our plaza, praying for each of the victims and the shooter by name.”Also, said Moorehead, “the students made a huge card for the people of Newtown and for the school and wanted to communicate their compassion and be available to the people of Newtown if they needed us.“Certainly what they went through was in many ways much more difficult because children were killed,” she added.After the shooting last spring, the school immediately came together for prayer and community, Jernagan said. “In the days following the shooting, we cancelled all classes and activities but kept the campus open, knowing that students, parents, faculty and staff would want to be together. We also sought help from local clergy and counselors, who made themselves available on campus for pastoral care and counseling.“One of the things that really blew me away is just how many Episcopal clergy flocked to our campus, without even being asked, simply to be with us. We had clergy come not only from local churches but from as far away as Tampa, Tallahassee and Palm Beach.“Prayer was a very important part of our healing,” she said. “We prayed and continue to pray weekly for Dale Regan, her family and for [shooter] Shane Schumerth and his family.”“Although campus continues to grieve and heal from last year’s tragedy, we started this school year on a hopeful note, vowing to live out Dale Regan’s legacy each day,” Jernagan said. “We look to our weekly chapel services as our main way to wrestle with the many lingering questions and emotions.”The school faculty was “much more traumatized by the tragedy,” Moorehead said. “The students rebounded much more quickly, especially the younger children. The faculty, on the other hand, has been engaged in a deep grieving process that is really still going on and will be for a few more years.”Regan had worked at the school for 34 years, she said. “I did know her well, and it was hard for me. I miss her. She was a friend.”Similarly, the Rev. D. Scott Russell, Episcopal chaplain to Virginia Tech University, found himself pastoring people who responded differently and grieved at different rates after a gunman shot and killed 32 students and wounded 17 more people at the secular university on April 16, 2007.“The student body has turned over almost twice now. We’re getting students who remember [the shootings] from when they were in middle school,” said Russell, campus minister and associate rector of Christ Episcopal Church in Blacksburg, Virginia. “For them, they know about it and we have a memorial service every year on the anniversary, but it’s really becoming part of the school history rather than a fresh reminder. But for some of us, it seems like yesterday.”In the days and weeks following the shootings, he had to “let people be in different places,” he said. “That was quite a juggling act with my students. Some of them were ready to move on almost immediately. … Other students were just beginning to grieve.”Although it’s been almost six years since the Virginia Tech shootings, the Connecticut tragedy rapidly triggered emotional memories of “sheer shock and horror and wondering how we move forward,” Russell said.“For some of us who lost people we knew, it’s still pretty fresh,” he said.The Connecticut news also stirred compassion and commiseration with the Newtown community as it tried to cope and grieve in the media spotlight, he said. When the media descended on Virginia Tech after the April 16, 2007, shootings, “One student said to me it felt like we were having a family funeral, but the press was in our living room.”In Blacksburg, they talk about life before and after April 16. “It really was a defining moment in our community that changed us forever,” Russell said. “We’ll never go back to what it was like before. We’re different people.”Likewise, the Sandy Hook community has entered what the Virginians call “the new normal.”Adjusting to its own “new normal,” the Jacksonville school is building a memorial plaza to protect and preserve the roots system of the 100-year-old campus “Great Oak” that was a favorite of the slain school head.After much prayer and contemplation, the school turned the office where Regan was killed into a chemistry lab, Moorehead said. “They decided it was important to reclaim the space, but for something different.”“I think the community is not only growing and thriving, but we’re becoming something different because of what’s happened to us, which is much like the Resurrection,” she said. “When Christ came back, he was changed.”— Sharon Sheridan is an ENS correspondent. Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Tags Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Submit a Press Release Curate Diocese of Nebraska February 26, 2013 at 8:55 pm Slight clarification on the live oak tree being protected. Having lived as a child on the property now used as the Episcopal School, the age of the tree was listed as several hundred years old and the largest such tree in Florida if not in the South. I am glad it is being protected in memory of Ms. Regan. The property was the private winter estate of Asa Packer, willed to the cathedral [before its designation] and used for many years as a home for boys from broken homes. My father was the first canon of the cathedral and we lived in the former guest house of the estate. Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Fr. Fred Lindstrom says: Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Robert McCloskey says: Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Youth Minister Lorton, VA Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA February 21, 2013 at 8:03 pm After I left the Catholic Church (as a priest) and for years before I renewed my vocation in the Episcopal Church, I worked in and retired from a law-enforcement career. I am not a fan of weapons as the solution to violance. On the other hand, I have to agree with Fr. Lindstrom that a trained, uniformed and armed lawman is both symbolic and potentially effective in preventing the kinds of “revenge” killings perpretrated by unbalanced individuals who seem to be competing for attention by way of mass homocide and suicide. Homocide and suicide, in that order. As these mass killers seeks attention, they compete for the least protected and greatest number of victims before they kill themselves. If they have to shoot their way in, there is a greater probability they will look for another target. Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ School shooting prompts prayers and new security reviews Rector Hopkinsville, KY Comments (3) In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Albany, NY Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Pittsburgh, PA Director of Music Morristown, NJ Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Collierville, TN Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Shreveport, LA Comments are closed. Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Press Release Service Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Bath, NC Submit a Job Listing Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Tampa, FL last_img read more

Hunger for food security, justice feeds Diocese of Los Angeles’…

first_imgHunger for food security, justice feeds Diocese of Los Angeles’ work Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Associate Rector Columbus, GA Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Bath, NC Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY By Lynette Wilson Posted Apr 6, 2015 Featured Events Director of Music Morristown, NJ Submit a Press Release Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Course Director Jerusalem, Israel The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Featured Jobs & Calls Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Knoxville, TN In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 April 6, 2015 at 10:26 am I belong to St. Andrew’s in Fullerton, Ca. W dug up our front lawn and made a beautiful garden! Since Andrew was a fisherman, we used small boats as raised beds! We grow all kinds of veggies and 100% of our food goes to local food banks. I can’t even describe the feelings that one gets when harvesting food and delivering it to people who truly appreciate it. Rev. Beth Kelly took Bishop Bruno’s request to heart, and she put his wishes into action. We have 5 teams that help maintain and plant and harvest every week. It’s a blessing. We are now known as the “church with all the boats.” I love being a part of a church that is truly doing God’s work! Come visit us some time! We would love to show people around and/or help them start gardens in their own church! Rector Martinsville, VA Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Submit a Job Listing An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud: Crossing continents and cultures with the most beautiful instrument you’ve never heard Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 Rector Shreveport, LA An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Albany, NY Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Shawn Cady says: New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Press Release Service Tags Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Pittsburgh, PA Comments are closed. Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Farmworker Ophelia Hernandez, Sarah Nolan, The Abundant Table’s director of programs and community partnerships, and Reyna Ortega, production manager, pose for a photograph in the field. Photo: Lynette Wilson/ENS[Episcopal News Service] Flying over Los Angeles, the city’s vastness comes sharply into focus. Its low buildings and sun-bleached concrete stretch on forever, but look closer at the greater metropolitan area, in the communities, schools and churchyards, and you’ll see gardens.The gardens are part of the Diocese of Los Angeles’ plan to address food security in the communities served by its parishes, and one of the ways it cares for the environment.In one of the nation’s largest cities in the top-producing agricultural state, people don’t have access to fresh fruits and vegetables. Through Seeds of Hope and The Abundant Table, the diocese is doing something about it.Three years ago, Los Angeles Bishop J. Jon Bruno decided to get serious about addressing food insecurity in his diocese and created Seeds of Hope, which works with congregations, communities and schools to turn unused land into productive gardens and orchards to provide healthy, fresh food to local residents.“In Los Angeles, access to nutritious food is a luxury,” said the Rev. Andrew K. Barnett, the bishop’s chair for environmental studies and food justice. “If you live in a low-income community, it’s much easier to get fast food.”The availability of fresh versus fast food has led to a 12-year life expectancy gap between residents of low-income neighborhoods and those who live in moderate-to-high-income neighborhoods, added Barnett.“We looked at that and said, ‘That’s unacceptable; that’s wrong.’”Up until the mid-1950s, “Los Angeles County was the main agricultural producing county … in the world,” said Tim Alderson, executive director of Seeds of Hope, in a Diocese of Los Angeles video. At the time of the diocese’s founding almost 120 years ago, 40 percent of the population was directly involved in agriculture.“Today, 1 percent of the population is involved in feeding the rest of us, which has created a real disconnect between us and the sources of our food, and that has led to obesity, diabetes, other metabolic disorders that affect us across the scale,” said Alderson.“We have people in our diocese who don’t know where their next meal is going to come from and those same people are obese.”Seeds of Hope takes a diocesan approach to producing and distributing food, and also serves to develop the resources necessary to empower parishes, schools and others to begin growing food. The intention is to make a direct impact on the health and wellness, both physically and spiritually, of people in the community.“Everything lands disproportionately on people living in poverty,” said Alderson in an interview with Episcopal News Service following a March 24 forum on the climate change crisis. “We decided we needed to address this serious issue in the underserved communities that we serve.”In contrast to other nations, Americans who live in poverty are more likely to be obese, and more likely to live in food deserts, or areas where access to fresh food is limited.Los Angeles County covers more than 4,000 square miles and is home to 10 million residents; 1.8 million, or 18 percent, live in poverty.The diocese – which stretches north to the city of Santa Maria, in Santa Barbara County, to San Clemente, the southern-most border of Orange County, east to the Arizona border, and west to the Pacific Ocean – covers a large geographic area and is home to 139 congregations, 40 schools and 20 institutions.Seeds of Hope Executive Director Tim Alderson harvesting oranges for the Cathedral Center food pantry. Photo: Courtesy of the Diocese of Los AngelesOne hundred and eight congregations participate in Seeds of Hope by either growing or distributing food or both, and half of its schools have gardens. Through a contract with the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health, it provides cooking/nutrition and fitness education to low-income residents at 17 churches in underserved communities, said Alderson.Since its inception in January 2013, Seeds of Hope has grown from one staff member to 16, including three full-time and three part-time positions, and 10 interns, and through combined efforts is producing 50 tons of fruits and vegetables – 800,000 servings – annually and is providing food to approximately 30,000 households monthly through food pantries.“We also serve more than 30,000 meals each month to people in need at our various meal programs,” said Alderson.Garden planting at Christ the Good Shepherd Episcopal Church in Los Angeles. Photo: Courtesy of the Diocese of Los AngelesNorth of Los Angeles, on 4.8 acres in Ventura County, The Abundant Table farm produces more than 50 varieties of fruits and vegetables, including beets, carrots, radishes, kale, chili peppers, tomatoes, lettuce, and cabbage.In addition to feeding the 150 members of their community-supported agriculture program, the farmers sell fresh produce to local schools and donate 10 percent of their harvest to a food bank.The Abundant Table is more than a farm, however; it’s also a church, an internship program, and a place where students, youth groups and others can gain a hands-on learning experience about food. Its mission is rooted in food justice – ensuring that people have access to fresh, nutritious foods, that farmworkers’ rights are respected and that the workers are paid a fair wage.“A foundational value of us is food justice,” said Sarah Nolan, director of programs and community partnerships.An ecumenical and interfaith ministry of the Episcopal and Lutheran churches, the farm church invites people of all faith traditions to explore spirituality in connection with the land.“We’re really looking at developing an ecosystem that creates an economically viable church and farm model,” said Nolan, adding that it’s experimental and that they are looking at how the farm supports worship and vice versa.Last year, The Abundant Table Farm Church received a $100,000 grant from an Episcopal Church initiative aimed at new church starts. The grant was funded through the Five Marks of Mission triennial budget. In this case, the Abundant Table Farm Church epitomizes the First Mark of Mission – to proclaim the good news of the kingdom.“Abundant Table is a community of practice that embodies a joyful and prophetic witness to the power of right relationships, not only to each other, but also with the land and with food,” said the Rev. Thomas Brackett, the Domestic and Foreign Missionary Society’s missioner for new church starts and missional initiatives, in an e-mail message.“[It models] wise actions that sustain intentional communities rooted in the ancient practices of following Jesus. It was the discernment of our First Mark [of Mission] funding council that we probably need 1,000 more Abundant Table ministries across the U.S. Sarah Nolan and Amy Grossman are out in front on a path that we will all need to eventually make by walking!”Last year, the Domestic and Foreign Missionary Society awarded Nolan an environmental stewardship fellowship through which she is working to build a national Episcopal network around food and agricultural ministries.“There are so many people doing things already,” she said, in addition to food banks and gardens. The Beecken Center of The School of Theology at Sewanee, for example, has created the Faith Farm and Food Network.One of the main questions she and others are asking is: “If The Episcopal Church looked at itself as a food system, what would we do differently?” Then subsequent questions might be: How would we use camps and conference centers differently? How would we connect churches with new and beginning farmers? How are food banks connecting with local farms? How does liturgy emerge out of what we are doing?In California, which is entering its fourth year of drought and where farmers have been forced to leave crops to rot in the fields, talking about food justice is an entry point for beginning discussions about ways to address climate change.“I think the power of connecting with where one’s food comes from and also participating in the growing process creates a relationship to the earth that forms a level of humility and wonder for God’s creation. In many ways, we know that it is difficult to express love and care for anyone or anything without a relationship,” said Nolan.“I don’t believe we can even begin to address the issues surrounding climate change, without developing a relationship to the earth and the people most impacted by the consequences of global warming,” she added. “I hope that every child, youth and adult that visits our farm experiences one step, if not more, in restoring a relationship with the plants, bugs, soil, people and all the complex relationships that make up our planet. For the Abundant Table it is the work of the church (especially a Eucharistic church) to help restore these relationships through the growing and sharing of food and invite others to join us in that work.”Editor’s note: Every Friday during these 30 Days of Action, we invite you to explore how the growing and sharing of food in your family, community and culture bring you closer God’s invitation to all of us to “till and keep” the earth.— Lynette Wilson is an editor/reporter for Episcopal News Service. Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Belleville, IL Rector Collierville, TN Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Poverty & Hunger AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Youth Minister Lorton, VA Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Washington, DC Comments (1) Submit an Event Listing Rector Tampa, FL Rector Smithfield, NC last_img read more

Hither Hills / Bates Masi + Architects

first_img Houses “COPY” ShareFacebookTwitterPinterestWhatsappMailOrhttps://www.archdaily.com/908934/hither-hills-bates-masi-plus-architects Clipboard Projects Manufacturers: DuPont, Kohler, Thermador, Arcadia Custom, The Shade Store Photographs:  Bates Masi + Architects Manufacturers Brands with products used in this architecture project Year:  Hither Hills / Bates Masi + ArchitectsSave this projectSaveHither Hills / Bates Masi + Architects “COPY” ArchDaily Save this picture!Courtesy of Bates Masi + ArchitectsText description provided by the architects. This seaside home provides its owners with a weekend respite from the city by optimizing its ties to the land and nature. Located in a postwar planned beach community with small lots plotted irrespective of the steep topography, the property lacked a level ground plane suited to the usual flush relationship between a house and its yard. By nesting the house’s volumes into the hillside and stepping them into six distinct levels, the spaces contained within seamlessly connect to the landscape.Save this picture!Courtesy of Bates Masi + ArchitectsThe bulk of the project’s resources are devoted to earthwork and site infrastructure to support this terraced configuration. A series of locally- sourced bluestone retaining walls stitch through the site, stepping back with the natural grade and running parallel with the shoreline. These structural walls negotiate the soft, clayey soils and frame the interior and exterior living spaces. Traditional public and private floor assignments are inverted, lifting primary living spaces above the neighboring rooflines, and opening the retracting glass wall onto the ocean’s views, breezes, and sunlight. Farthest into the site at the top of the hill lies the swimming pool, set on the sole patch of naturally level ground on par with the house’s upper level. A parallel system of interior and exterior circulation sheltered by cantilevers and roof projections facilitates the “upside-down” configuration while promoting connections to the outdoors.Save this picture!Courtesy of Bates Masi + ArchitectsOn closer inspection, a refined palette of materials is articulated to enhance the effects of nature and harmonize with the landscape. Outside, the bluestone walls’ joints run vertically, expressive of their insertion into the earth and supportive structural role. In counterpoint, naturally-weathered horizontal mahogany decking spans between the stone walls and alternates as a covering for the roofs, walls, floors, and ceilings of the inhabited spaces. Inside, oak louvers on canvas hinges under an oversized skylight sway in the ocean breezes, casting dynamic patterns of light and providing cooling shade much like a tree’s canopy. An elongated variant of the same louvers forms a chandelier of sorts under lighting at the dining room table. Lightweight curtains lining openings to the outside activate similarly under the effects of natural light and air, rendering the intangible tangible.Save this picture!Courtesy of Bates Masi + ArchitectsSave this picture!Courtesy of Bates Masi + ArchitectsBy integrating the house with its terrain and animating its details to enhance appreciation of the environment, this carefully positioned and developed design provides a vibrant sensory immersion in nature on a challenging site. For owners and visitors alike a stay in the home is both rejuvenating and enriching.Save this picture!Courtesy of Bates Masi + ArchitectsProject gallerySee allShow lessKPF Completes the Third-Tallest Building in ShenzhenArchitecture NewsThe Most Anticipated Projects of 2019Articles Share 2015 Photographscenter_img Architects: Bates Masi + Architects Area Area of this architecture project Area:  3350 ft² Year Completion year of this architecture project United States Save this picture!Courtesy of Bates Masi + Architects+ 15Curated by María Francisca González Share ShareFacebookTwitterPinterestWhatsappMailOrhttps://www.archdaily.com/908934/hither-hills-bates-masi-plus-architects Clipboard Lead Architects: Products translation missing: en-US.post.svg.material_description Hither Hills / Bates Masi + Architects Paul Masi, AIA, LEED AP CopyHouses•Montauk, United States CopyAbout this officeBates Masi + ArchitectsOfficeFollowProductsWoodConcrete#TagsProjectsBuilt ProjectsSelected ProjectsResidential ArchitectureHousesMontaukUnited StatesPublished on January 07, 2019Cite: “Hither Hills / Bates Masi + Architects” 07 Jan 2019. ArchDaily. Accessed 11 Jun 2021. ISSN 0719-8884Browse the CatalogPartitionsSkyfoldChoosing the Skyfold Wall for Your SpaceGlass3MSun Control Window Film in MarkthalBathroom AccessorieshansgroheBath & Shower ThermostatsCabinetsFlorenseCabinet – FloAirWood Boards / HPL PanelsBruagStair Railing – CELLON®LightsLouis PoulsenOutdoor Lighting – Flindt GardenBathroom AccessoriesBradley Corporation USAHigh Speed Hand Dryers – Aerix+BoardsForestOneLaminate – EGGER laminatesAcousticSchöckStaircase Insulation – Tronsole®Metal PanelsRHEINZINKPanel Systems – Horizontal PanelWall / Ceiling LightsA-LightAccolade Wall Light at River Dental OfficeBricksStröherClinker Brick Slips – StiltreuMore products »Save世界上最受欢迎的建筑网站现已推出你的母语版本!想浏览ArchDaily中国吗?是否翻译成中文现有为你所在地区特制的网站?想浏览ArchDaily中国吗?Take me there »✖You’ve started following your first account!Did you know?You’ll now receive updates based on what you follow! Personalize your stream and start following your favorite authors, offices and users.Go to my streamlast_img read more

Daily Mirror and British Gas support multi-charity SMS appeal

first_img AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis Howard Lake | 23 October 2003 | News Tagged with: Digital About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving.  23 total views,  1 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis Daily Mirror and British Gas support multi-charity SMS appeal The Daily Mirror and British Gas are supporting a mobile phone donation campaign for the seven charities that make up the Here to Help campaign.Consumers are being encouraged to donate using a premium rate SMS, with donations being used by the charities to tackle UK household poverty.The technical element of the appeal is being handled by the Mirror Group’s mobile arm Arrow Interactive. Each SMS costs £1.50 of which 67p is received by the charities. Donors receive a message with statistics about poverty in the UK. Advertisementlast_img read more

Pasadena Unified, Teamsters Reach Salary Agreement

first_img Name (required)  Mail (required) (not be published)  Website  faithfernandez More » ShareTweetShare on Google+Pin on PinterestSend with WhatsApp,PCC – EducationVirtual Schools PasadenaDarrell Done EducationHomes Solve Community/Gov/Pub SafetyPASADENA EVENTS & ACTIVITIES CALENDARClick here for Movie Showtimes Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked * Business News The Pasadena Unified School District Board of Education and Teamsters Local 911 entered into a Salary Increase Agreement on Sept. 24, 2015. This collaborative agreement is in keeping with the district’s priority of working to retain and fairly compensate staff.I am pleased to see this agreement reached with the Teamsters,” said Superintendent Brian McDonald, Ed.D. “The Teamsters have proven to be collaborative partners who embrace the vision that we must all work collectively to ensure students reach their full potential.”Teamsters’ bargaining unit members will receive a three percent salary increase retroactive to July 1, 2015. Retroactive checks and the three percent salary increase are expected to be disbursed to unit members no later than December 2015.PUSD is committed to supporting employees who exemplify district values and strategic priorities by empowering, retaining and fairly compensating staff.Stay connected to the Pasadena Unified School District! Visit us online at www.pusd.us; follow us on Twitter @PasadenaUnified, www.twitter.com/PasadenaUnified; like us on Facebook at www.facebook.com/PasadenaUnifiedSchoolDistrict; text PUSD to 888777; and subscribe to our YouTube channel at www.youtube.com/klrnpasadena. Or call the Communications Office, 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., Monday through Friday at (626) 396-3606.Our Children. Learning Today. Leading Tomorrow. Top of the News Get our daily Pasadena newspaper in your email box. Free.Get all the latest Pasadena news, more than 10 fresh stories daily, 7 days a week at 7 a.m. Make a comment Community News Herbeauty8 Easy Exotic Meals Anyone Can MakeHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyThe Most Obvious Sign A Guy Likes You Is When He Does ThisHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyHe Is Totally In Love With You If He Does These 7 ThingsHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyYou’ll Want To Get Married Twice Or Even More Just To Put Them OnHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty10 Most Influential Women In HistoryHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyYou Can’t Go Past Our Healthy Quick RecipesHerbeautyHerbeauty More Cool Stuffcenter_img 2 recommended0 commentsShareShareTweetSharePin it Pasadena Will Allow Vaccinated People to Go Without Masks in Most Settings Starting on Tuesday Pasadena’s ‘626 Day’ Aims to Celebrate City, Boost Local Economy First Heatwave Expected Next Week Home of the Week: Unique Pasadena Home Located on Madeline Drive, Pasadena Education Pasadena Unified, Teamsters Reach Salary Agreement From STAFF REPORTS Published on Thursday, October 15, 2015 | 4:50 pm Community News EVENTS & ENTERTAINMENT | FOOD & DRINK | THE ARTS | REAL ESTATE | HOME & GARDEN | WELLNESS | SOCIAL SCENE | GETAWAYS | PARENTS & KIDS Subscribelast_img read more

Second year at the top for Laurel Hill Coláiste

first_imgLimerick Ladies National Football League opener to be streamed live TAGSeducationGLENSTAL AbbeyLaurel Hill ColáistelimerickSunday Times Top 400 Schools Advertisement Limerick’s National Camogie League double header to be streamed live RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Linkedin Twitter Pupils from Ireland’s top school, Laurel Hill Coláiste FCJ, celebrate:Orna De Cantalun, Aishling Ni Chleirigh, Norma Ni Luinneachain, vice principal Michelle Ni Shtolman, Sorcha Nic Giolla Cheara, Lorna Ni Chuilleagain, Aedin Ni Bhrian principal, Yvonne Ni Fhlaithbheartaigh,Aoife Ni Giolla PhadraigLIMERICK’S Laurel Hill Coláiste FCJ has been ranked the number one secondary school in Ireland for the second year running.The South Circular Road school topped the 2015 Sunday Times guide to Ireland’s 400 best schools this week, after becoming the first Irish-language school to gain the top spot last year.Sign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up It was also the only non-fee-paying school to top the table in the last ten years and last year was the first all girls’ school to be named the best school in Ireland since 2009.The only other Limerick school featured in the top ten was Glenstal Abbey School, Murroe in seventh place, down from second place in 2014.The boys’ boarding school was the top school in 2012 and 2013.Two Cork city schools – the all-boys Presentation Brothers College and all-girls Scoil Mhuire were named numbers two and three respectively.Kate Butler of the Sunday Times, who compiled the list, said Munster schools performed well this year.She said: “Munster has generally being doing extremely well. Even though it has only half the population of Leinster, it has almost as many schools in our top 100.Laurel Hill Coláiste FCJ principal Aedín Ní Bhriain said: “Laurel Hill Coláiste FCJ has a long standing tradition of academic excellence and we look forward to continuing this tradition into the future. Equally important is our commitment to companionship and to the sense of community here in school.“Both our teaching and administrative staff have always given 100 per cent to the curricular and extracurricular activities.”The Sunday Times Parent Power survey ranks the top 400 secondary schools on the average number of pupils gaining university places over the course of three years. Email Previous articleParquet Courts play Limerick Seoda ShowNext articleInside Shannon John Keoghhttp://www.limerickpost.ie center_img Predictions on the future of learning discussed at Limerick Lifelong Learning Festival WATCH: “Everyone is fighting so hard to get on” – Pat Ryan on competitive camogie squads Vanishing Ireland podcast documenting interviews with people over 70’s, looking for volunteers to share their stories WhatsApp NewsSecond year at the top for Laurel Hill ColáisteBy John Keogh – September 2, 2015 1672 Facebook Print Limerick Artist ‘Willzee’ releases new Music Video – “A Dream of Peace” last_img read more

Tablighi Jamaat: Delhi Court Dismisses Plea Moved By State Against The Discharge of 44 Foreign Nationals

first_imgNews UpdatesTablighi Jamaat: Delhi Court Dismisses Plea Moved By State Against The Discharge of 44 Foreign Nationals Karan Tripathi19 Nov 2020 7:48 AMShare This – xDelhi Court has dismissed the criminal revision petitions moved by the State against the discharge of 44 foreign nationals related to the Tablighi Jamaat case. While dismissing the said revision petitions, the court of Additional Sessions Judge Sandeep Yadav noted that the evidence collected during the investigation is wholly insufficient to frame the charge against…Your free access to Live Law has expiredTo read the article, get a premium account.Your Subscription Supports Independent JournalismSubscription starts from ₹ 599+GST (For 6 Months)View PlansPremium account gives you:Unlimited access to Live Law Archives, Weekly/Monthly Digest, Exclusive Notifications, Comments.Reading experience of Ad Free Version, Petition Copies, Judgement/Order Copies.Subscribe NowAlready a subscriber?LoginDelhi Court has dismissed the criminal revision petitions moved by the State against the discharge of 44 foreign nationals related to the Tablighi Jamaat case. While dismissing the said revision petitions, the court of Additional Sessions Judge Sandeep Yadav noted that the evidence collected during the investigation is wholly insufficient to frame the charge against the Respondents. The said criminal revision petitions were moved against the order dated 24/08/20 of the Chief Metropolitan Magistrate wherein the respondent foreign nationals were discharged of all the charges against them. The State had invoked the FIR registered against the respondents wherein they’ve been charged under section 14 (b) of Foreigners Act, Section 3 of the Epidemic Diseases Act 1897, Section 51 of the Disaster Management Act and Section 188/269/270/271/120B of the Indian Penal Code. While discharging the respondents, the CMM had noted that the entire chargesheet and documents attached thereto neither showed their presence nor participation in the Markez during the relevant period. The CMM had further noted that: ‘there is no document on record to suggest that respondent was one of the participants who was involved in Tablighi work. It was further observed that name of the respondent is not specifically mentioned either in the copy of the register seized or in the list of SDM providing the details of the persons who were sent from Markaz either to the hospital or Quarantine Centers or the list of persons who were part of Markez and were tested for Covid-19.’ While upholding the order of the CMM, the present court observed that: ‘In the present case, no vital information was extracted from the respondent which could form the basis for carving out an exception to the general provision about inadmissibility of confession made in police custody.No admission of any vital fact was made by the respondent in response to the questionnaire and hence, the reference to Section 58 of Indian Evidence Act is of no consequence.’ The Respondents in the present matter were represented by Ms Ashima Mandla and Ms Mandakini SinghClick Here To Download Order[Read Order]Subscribe to LiveLaw, enjoy Ad free version and other unlimited features, just INR 599 Click here to Subscribe. All payment options available.loading….Next Storylast_img read more